CloudFoundry

Continuous Delivery Among the Donkeys

26 Feb , 2015  

I was recently asked to give a brief overview of the mainstream market for continuous integration and continuous deployment and how companies are using it. The audience was a mixture of HeavyBit portfolio companies and their customers. So, it provided a nice mix of sellers and buyers. Since this topic comes up all the time in Pivotal conversations, I thought it’d be worth going over here as well.

Carrots on Heads, Please

Source: (PBF Comics)[http://www.pbfcomics.com/253/]

Source: (PBF Comics)[http://www.pbfcomics.com/253/]

I’m often fascinated—if agog in wonderment—at what the “elite” of the tech world are doing, those “unicorns.” There’s even “horses” out there—high performing organizations that are keeping up with those unicorns. But, I’m most interested in the normal folks, “donkeys,” as I like to think of them. I like seeing how the donkeys are doing when they strap a carrot to their head and try to keep up with the unicorns.

If you’re the type of person who wants the benefits of Cloud Foundry (making sure you’re shaving the right yak, focusing on application development instead of infrastructure development), you’ll want the benefits of continuous delivery, namely, speeding up your software delivery pipeline by automating as much as possible from builds, to tests, and even promoting builds to production.

These are outcomes of doing CD. The overarching goal is to reduce the cycle time to get new features into production, helping you establish a feedback loop that you then use to guide the perfection of your software. That last part is key, and often “money left on the table” when organizations stop short of changing their process.

So, let’s take a look at a quick survey of studies on how CD is doing out there in donkey-land.

Yeah. Everyone Wants a Pony. Astute Question, Boss

When I was at 451 Research, we did two studies of the DevOps market, from a donkey perspective. The first study had 201 participants, the second 300. We achieved a good cross-industry mix, not just people in the technology world. There were plenty of horses and donkeys in there. One of the first questions we asked was around each company’s desires to speed up software deployment. That is a core benefit of DevOps (perhaps the core benefit), and certainly a core benefit of continuous delivery.

In aggregate, the answer was painfully obvious—of course people wanted to go faster. Everyone wants a pony! Sliced up by industry, things got a little more interesting:

There are obvious ones who want to speed up like retail, entertainment, and SaaS companies. Industries like transportation can seem weird until you realize that IT-driven companies like Fedex, UPS, or even Uber are in that category (which is to say, there’s tremendous competitive pressure for IT to move faster). On the low-end, it’s sort of depressing that health care is less interested (I know I’d certainly like more, interesting uses of software when I visit the doctor), and perhaps things like construction are not so surprising.

When I look at this chart it helps me triangulate what types of industries are most interested in using software to change how they do their business. Those industries on the left side are certainly high on the list of people who’d be interested in continuous delivery, one would assume.

The Job To Be Done: A Platform for Speedy Software Delivery

With the desire to speed up software delivery frequency, we’ve found the job to be done. Now, a job to be done is a fun way of describing the problem a product or service solves—what “job” does a customer “hire” a business to do? I hire a hamburger to (a.) fill me up, and, (b.) make me happy. In contrast, when I’m on a long road-trip, I might just “hire” a gas station hot dog drowning in pump-chilli to fill me up, but not really make me happy.

In the realm of continuous integration and continuous delivery, there’s a clear job to be done—creating the “pipeline” for packaging up, verifying, and then deploying software into production. That is, everything between writing code and operating it. Someone once suggested to me that DevOps was simply the evolution of continuous delivery, which, while not entirely accurate, is useful framing. In that sense, I think it’s good to use one of the older but still useful process studies from the DevOps world, the software delivery platform:

Originally published in 2012, it’s stood the test of time and even popped up in one of the more useful cloud books of last year, The Practice of Cloud System Administration. CI/CD plays a huge, if not necessary, role in this process. One key point is to think of structured platform—moving code through this “pipeline” requires a lot of standardization and discipline. The alternative of re-inventing the packaging and infrastructure layers each time is the wrong kind of chaos.

There’s another vital part missing from the diagram, though, usually not from the conversation around it—a feedback loop. In addition to just getting software out the door more frequently, the primary business benefit of continuous delivery and DevOps (you see how those two so neatly dance around with each other?) is access to oodles of feedback about how customers are using your software.  This is used to hone and modify your software to better fit what your customers want, and one presumes <hopes>, that it leads to making more money from them.

Adapting to this feedback loop is the “money on the table” when it comes to process. I see very few donkeys taking advantage of those feedback loops, and the horses and unicorns even struggle with changing their process. Surveys and anecdotes alike show that people feel like things are often going wrong with their modern IT projects and often blame doing too little when it comes to change.

Speaking of Failure: CI/CD Use is Low in Donkey-land

Getting down to actual tool-usage, surveys from 451 and others, show a consistently lower use of CI/CD tools than you’d expect:

Here, you see the sad donut and some confirming, but encouraging survey data from DZone.

The sad donut shows that somewhere between 25–30% of the respondents are using CD tools like Jenkins, Bamboo, or hosted CI/CD services. There is a seemingly positive 35%, let’s call it, who are creating their own CD platforms. In past years, “rolling your own” when it came to service delivery platforms was needed and there was no other option. But, the technology is mature at this point, calling into question the strategic worth of DIY’ing your continious delivery platform. Effort spent creating your own CD tool is probably better spent on, you know, the actual software your customers use. The most distressing part of the donut is the near 30% of respondents who are doing nothing. I call this “distressing,” because, one, I like to be hyperbolic to keep myself awake, and, two, because CD as an idea and technology has been around a long time, well over five years. It is hard for me to imagine a software development team that wouldn’t benefit from it.

Now that I don’t work at an analyst shop, I can freely mix and match research data. So, I wanted to pull in some additional survey results on CD. On the right, you can see a year over year comparison of a DZone study, first listing companies who believed they did CD and then, according to a pretty good criteria based on orginization indicators laid out by Martin Fowler, judging which of those respondents are actually doing CD. Again, the results are somewhat shocking, but help triangulate the sad donut.

The Pipeline Is Your Platform, Perfect It!

For ease-of-thinking and strategic application, I wanted to simplify the software delivery platform diagram a bit. So, here it is with Pivotal colors!

There are a few things to think about:

  1. The most valuable part of this process is actually a handful of pixels—the first few steps where you’re creating the software used to help run your business. The feedback loop is clearly key to getting the right specifications in place and making sure you’re writing software that is actually effective. I believe these first two boxes are where most companies—most donkeys to be sure—should spend the majority of their effort (and yes, one should bundle test/verify in there, that’s always nice…).
  2. Over recent years, we’ve spent most of our time as an industry focused on the rest of the boxes, especially the infrastructure platform and production concerns boxes. Topics like cloud, OpenStack, and containers have made this area a churning pool of excitement. When I was an analyst and doing cloud strategy, I came across enterprises all the time who wanted to build their own platforms out of piece parts. For some—often the unicorns—it makes sense, or at least it used to. For others, it’s probably gold-plating and a mis-application of time and money. Unlike in recent years, there’s are so many “off the web” (to morph the old OTC idea) infrastructure parts that you’re likely better just using one of those rather than letting your people go crazy with the always entertaining task of building a platform.
  3. You also need to be on the look-out for fat boy scouts in this pipeline. If you lead an exciting enough life that you’ve read The Goal (a “business novel”), you’ll hopefully recall the lesson of the fat boy scout—your line of marching boy scouts will only be as fast as the slowest marcher. It follows that optimizing anything else before addressing bottlenecks is a waste of time. Focus on analyzing the whole process (i.e., the pipeline) and ruthlessly remove the bottlenecks. If you want an IT nerd version of The Goal, check out the more recent The Phoenix Project.

All of this raises a larger point. While we might think of all of this as Agile and the sort of cowboy codery that’s often associated with it…there’s actually a tremendous amount of discipline, process, and careful work involved in running a business with a continuous delivery engine. It’s much more than just using a tool. It relies on building out and perfecting the entire pipeline. The rewards are high, though—getting software out the door faster, making customers happier, which hopefully leads to more profits.

Let’s Fix the Sad Donut

From the anemic, but slowly beefing up, usage of CD we’re seeing out there it’s clear that we can do better as an industry. Almost five years after the publication of the Continuous Delivery book, there’s a lot of that half full glass to fill. In the meantime, the growing interest in developing mobile applications, cloud native applications,12 factor style applications, DevOps, and cloud in general has sparked a renewed interest in the otherwise sleepy,but always valuable, corner of the IT world, software development. Software development is suddenly very interesting and the focus of lots of great work and innovation from companies large and small. Indeed, HeavyBit’s investment thesis is that development tools as a market is fast becoming a big deal again; a strategic point that Pivotal obviously believes as well. Part of the goal of Pivotal Cloud Foundry is to provide as much as possible in the nature of structured platforms to slim up all those fat boy scouts in the pipeline. While the label “Platform-as-a-Service” has been and is certainly one that applies, we prefer to think of what we offer as a set of tools that helps our customer perfect the software delivery pipeline, that is: a platform.

Recommended Reading:

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CloudFoundry

Build Newsletter: Open Source, PaaS, Big Data for Developers – February 2015

13 Feb , 2015  

featured-buildIn this month’s Build Newsletter, the state of the open source, big data and PaaS markets continue to be the main threads throughout the industry news.

Open Source

First, we love this report on the Linux Foundation’s assessment of how open source projects such as OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Docker are driving both innovation and enterprise readiness in cloud technology.Apache Hadoop® is another excellent example of how wide adoption of projects dramatically shifts the market, as we see in this article on Deutsche Bank’s latest Hadoop study (big data OSS). OSS has both become a wonderful way for companies to collaborate on technology and also create high growth business such as the record breaking business performance with Pivotal Cloud Foundry.  Two other related and noteworthy items include independent analyst Steve Chambers’ highlights on Cloud Foundry’s impressive first year, retracting a previous “bearish” attitude, and Matt Asay’s analysis asking if Cloud Foundry will be the next Red Hat.In our own experience, we have seen customers shift their buying, preferring OSS-based solutions as much as possible. Tesora’s shift to OSS within the OpenStack ecosystem is a great example of this.Individual contributors are the lifeblood of OSS, but you don’t have to be a developer checking in code to contribute.  Here are 8 ways you can contribute to open source projects without writing code.Sometimes, OSS projects may seem to run in their own silos or ecosystem niches.  Part of the power of OSS comes when contributors help increase the “innovation surface area” by bridging and connecting technologies. Several excellent examples can be seen here in multiple Spring and CF projects bridging PaaS, cloud, Apache Hadoop®, and MySQL:

Finally, in an effort to better align investment with the primary challenges Pivotal is trying to solve, Pivotal is looking for new sponsors for Groovy and Grails.

Custom Development and PaaS

First up is an interesting analysis by Redmonk, suggesting the most popular programming languages in use today. The top 5 all run on Cloud Foundry—JavaScript (e.g. Node.js), Java, PHP, Python, and Ruby (tied for 5th).On to platform decisions—there is always the ongoing debate whether to build or buy a development platform. Here is an explanation on how you might choose what works for you. Either way, development platforms are undergoing significant change with the rise of Docker and PaaS ecosystems such as Cloud Foundry, and this is having a profound effect on traditional IT operations and processes.More technical descriptions of PaaS can be found in this slideshow of The Cloud Foundry Story from @DevOpsSummit and this deeper dive on Why Services are Essential to Your Platform as a Service.Finally, a “How To” on  12-Factor App-Style Backing Services and a narrative on old versus new app deployment methods (with microservices in a PaaS) are two examples of techniques that today’s developers use with PaaS.Pivotal-Blog-CTA-NewBigData

Big Data and Data Science for Developers

First, Gigaom suggests all developers need to become familiar with big data technologies and use cases since soon every business application will likely incorporate some big data functionality.For example, big data is making its way into digital travel services—Expedia plans to “double the size” of their Apache Hadoop® cluster in 2015 to help solve its big data challenges in the UK, having previously only used DB2 and Microsoft SQL databases.Not convinced yet? Here is SaaS visionary Mark Benioff and two separate executive research surveys saying big data and predictive analytics are top priorities and that CEOs desire big data solutions: 1)  PwC CEO Survey Recap: Mobile, Data Mining, and Analysis most important 2) IDG Enterprise Big Data Research. Expect funding for future projects and all the market requirements you are building towards to reflect such priorities.Cloud Foundry is useful for big data and analytical applications as this blog about Cloud Foundry for Data Scientists reveals, and in how Pivotal built a Super Bowl social sentiment analysis application in less than a day on Cloud Foundry using microservices.Editor’s Note: Apache, Apache Hadoop, Hadoop, and the yellow elephant logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Apache Software Foundation in the United States and/or other countries.

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CloudFoundry

Build Newsletter: Open Source, PaaS, Big Data for Developers – February 2015

13 Feb , 2015  

featured-buildIn this month’s Build Newsletter, the state of the open source, big data and PaaS markets continue to be the main threads throughout the industry news.

Open Source

First, we love this report on the Linux Foundation’s assessment of how open source projects such as OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Docker are driving both innovation and enterprise readiness in cloud technology.Apache Hadoop® is another excellent example of how wide adoption of projects dramatically shifts the market, as we see in this article on Deutsche Bank’s latest Hadoop study (big data OSS). OSS has both become a wonderful way for companies to collaborate on technology and also create high growth business such as the record breaking business performance with Pivotal Cloud Foundry.  Two other related and noteworthy items include independent analyst Steve Chambers’ highlights on Cloud Foundry’s impressive first year, retracting a previous “bearish” attitude, and Matt Asay’s analysis asking if Cloud Foundry will be the next Red Hat.In our own experience, we have seen customers shift their buying, preferring OSS-based solutions as much as possible. Tesora’s shift to OSS within the OpenStack ecosystem is a great example of this.Individual contributors are the lifeblood of OSS, but you don’t have to be a developer checking in code to contribute.  Here are 8 ways you can contribute to open source projects without writing code.Sometimes, OSS projects may seem to run in their own silos or ecosystem niches.  Part of the power of OSS comes when contributors help increase the “innovation surface area” by bridging and connecting technologies. Several excellent examples can be seen here in multiple Spring and CF projects bridging PaaS, cloud, Apache Hadoop®, and MySQL:

Finally, in an effort to better align investment with the primary challenges Pivotal is trying to solve, Pivotal is looking for new sponsors for Groovy and Grails.

Custom Development and PaaS

First up is an interesting analysis by Redmonk, suggesting the most popular programming languages in use today. The top 5 all run on Cloud Foundry—JavaScript (e.g. Node.js), Java, PHP, Python, and Ruby (tied for 5th).On to platform decisions—there is always the ongoing debate whether to build or buy a development platform. Here is an explanation on how you might choose what works for you. Either way, development platforms are undergoing significant change with the rise of Docker and PaaS ecosystems such as Cloud Foundry, and this is having a profound effect on traditional IT operations and processes.More technical descriptions of PaaS can be found in this slideshow of The Cloud Foundry Story from @DevOpsSummit and this deeper dive on Why Services are Essential to Your Platform as a Service.Finally, a “How To” on  12-Factor App-Style Backing Services and a narrative on old versus new app deployment methods (with microservices in a PaaS) are two examples of techniques that today’s developers use with PaaS.Pivotal-Blog-CTA-NewBigData

Big Data and Data Science for Developers

First, Gigaom suggests all developers need to become familiar with big data technologies and use cases since soon every business application will likely incorporate some big data functionality.For example, big data is making its way into digital travel services—Expedia plans to “double the size” of their Apache Hadoop® cluster in 2015 to help solve its big data challenges in the UK, having previously only used DB2 and Microsoft SQL databases.Not convinced yet? Here is SaaS visionary Mark Benioff and two separate executive research surveys saying big data and predictive analytics are top priorities and that CEOs desire big data solutions: 1)  PwC CEO Survey Recap: Mobile, Data Mining, and Analysis most important 2) IDG Enterprise Big Data Research. Expect funding for future projects and all the market requirements you are building towards to reflect such priorities.Cloud Foundry is useful for big data and analytical applications as this blog about Cloud Foundry for Data Scientists reveals, and in how Pivotal built a Super Bowl social sentiment analysis application in less than a day on Cloud Foundry using microservices.Editor’s Note: Apache, Apache Hadoop, Hadoop, and the yellow elephant logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Apache Software Foundation in the United States and/or other countries.

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CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

RESOURCES:

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CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

PLAY EPISODE #15

 

RESOURCES:

Transcript

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the All Things Pivotal podcast, the podcast at the intersection of agile, cloud, and big data. Stay tuned for regular updates, technical deep dives, architecture discussions, and interviews. Please share your feedback with us by e-mailing podcast@pivotal.io.

Simon Elisha:

Hello everyone and welcome back to the All Things Pivotal podcast. Fantastic to have you back. My name is Simon Elisha. Good to have you with me again today. A quick and punchy podcast this week, but an interesting one nonetheless hopefully and answering a question that comes up quite commonly. Well, it’s really 2 questions. The first question is, how can I try out Pivotal Cloud Foundry really, really quickly without any set up time? Which often relates to my answer being, ‘Well have you heard of Pivotal Web Services?’ To which people say, ‘What is Pivotal Web Services?’ Also known as, PWS. Also known as P-Dubs.

Pivotal Web Services is a service available on the Web, funnily enough, at run.pivotal.io. It is a hosted version of Pivotal Cloud Foundry running on Amazon Web Services in the US. It provides a platform upon which you can use as a developer, push applications to it, organize your workspaces, and really use as a development platform or even as a production location for your applications. It is a fully-featured running version of Pivotal CF in the Cloud. Not surprisingly, that’s what Pivotal CF can do, but this provides a hosted version for you.

Let’s unpack this a little bit and have a look at what it is and why you might want to use it. The first thing that’s good to know is you can connect to run.pivotal.io straight away. You don’t need a credit card to start and you get a 60-day free trial. I’ll talk about what you get in that 60-day free trial shortly, but the good thing to know is you can go and try it straight away. Often when I’m talking to customers and they’re getting their toe in the water with platforms and service and they’re trying to understand what it is and they say, ‘Oh where can I just try and push an app or test something out?’ I say, ‘Hey go to Pivotal Web Services, it’s free, you can try it out, you can grab an application you’ve got on the shelf and just see what it’s like.’ They go, ‘Well that’s pretty cool, I can do it straight away.’ No friction in that happening.

In terms of what you can use on the platform, so we currently support apps written in Java, Grails, Play, Spring, Node.js, Ruby on Rails, Sinatra, Go, Python, or PHP. Any of those ones will automatically be discovered and [hey presto 02:37] CF push and away we go. If you’ve been listening to previous episodes you’ll know the magic of the CF push process. If however you need another language, you can use a Community Buildpack or you can even write a custom one yourself that will run on the platform as well. Obviously, if you’re running an application you may want to consume some services. You can choose from a variety of third party data bases, e-mail services, monitoring services, that exist in the Marketplace, that exist on Pivotal Cloud Foundry. I’ll run you through what some of those services are because there really is a nice selection available for you.

What you then do is you buy into those services within your application and Pivotal Cloud Foundry, and P-Dubs in particular, takes care of all the connection criteria or the buying in process or the credentials etc, which make it nice and easy. You may be saying, ‘Well hmm, what does this cost me to get access to this kind of platform?’ Well, it’s a really simple, simple model. It’s application centric and you pay 3 cents US per gig per hour. That’s the per hour cost is for the amount of memory used by the application to run. Now, with that 3 cents you get included your routing, so your traffic routing, your load balancing, you can up to 1 gig of ephemeral disk space on your app instances. You get free storage for your application files when they get pushed to the platform. You don’t pay for that storage cost at all. You get bandwidth both in and out, up to 2 terabytes of bandwidth. You get unified log streaming, which we’ll talk about and health management, which we’ll also talk about.

As you can imagine, this could be very cost-effective platform for dev test and production workloads because you’re only paying for what you use when you use it and you’re only paying at the application layer on a per memory basis. Now, there’s a really handy pricing tab on the Pivotal Web Services page that lets you put in how many app instances you’d need for your application and will punch out for you that cost on a per month basis for the hosting, which is really, really nice.

What are some of the things that we allow you to do with this platform? What are some of the benefits? As I mentioned, you get the 60-day free trial and the 60-day free trial, you get 2 gig of application memory, so it can run applications that consume up to 2 gig of aggregate memory. It can have up to 10 application services from the free tier of the Marketplace. This means you get to play with quite a lot of capability at very low cost, very, very easily.

Aside from pushing your app, which is yeah, nice and easy and something you want to do, what else do we do with this? Well, we can [elect 05:17] to have performance monitoring. In the developer console, which you can log into, you can see all your spaces, your applications and their status, how many services are bound to them etc. You can drill into them in more detail to see what they’re actually consuming. If you want even more detailed monitoring, so inside the application type monitoring, you can use New Relic for that and that’s a service that’s offered in the Marketplace. It has a zero touch configuration. For Java applications, you can basically [crank and bind 05:47] you New Relic service to your app very, very simply with basically no configuration. It’s amazing. For other languages like Ruby or Java Script, you have to the New Relic [agent 05:56] running, but it’s still a pretty trivial process to get it up and going.

Now, once your application is running, you probably want to make sure it keeps running. A normal desire to have. We have this thing called, The Health Manager. This is an automated system that monitors your application for you and if your application instances exit you to an error or something happens where the number of instances is less than the ones that you actually created when you did your CF push or CF Scale, the platform will automatically recover those particular instances for you. Obviously, the log will be updated to indicate that that took place. If you set up an application and you have 3 instances running, it will run them for you. If one of them fails, it will spin up another one for you and you’re good to go.

Another capability is, of course, the Unified Log Streaming. One of the features of Pivotal CF is the ability to bring logs together from multiple application instances into the one place. In PWS, we do the same thing. We have this streaming log API that will send all the information, all the components, for your application to the one location. You can tailor this interactively yourself or you can use a syslog drain too, once you have a third party tool you may like. Tools like, Splunk or Logstash etc. They’re all scoped by a unique application ID and an instance index, so they can correlate across multiple events and see how they all fit together, which is nice.

The system also has a really nice Web console, which is built for really agile developers to use. You jump in, you can see what applications are running, where, who started them, what’s going on. You can even connect your spacers with your CI pipeline to make sure that builds are going into the correct life cycle stage of being deployed appropriately as well. You can also see quotas and building across your spacers because you have access to organizations and spacers as well. We’ll talk about organizations and spacers in another episode.

What about from a services perspective? What are some of the services that we have available in the Marketplace? Well, it’s growing all the time. It’s a movable face, as I like to say. We have a number. I’ll just call out a few highlight ones. Things like, Searchify for search, BlazeMeter for load testing, Redis Cloud, which is an enterprise-class cache. We talked about caches a little while ago, ClearDB, which is a MySQL database service. We have Searchly, ElasticSearch. We have the Memcached [D 08:19] Cloud. We have SendGrid for sending e-mail, MongoLab for MongoDB as a service, New Relic obviously for access to performance criteria. RabbitMQ, so through Cloud AMQP, ElephantSQL, PostgreSQL as a service etc, etc. A good selection of services there are available to you to use.

It’s interesting seeing what people use this for. Often, customers who use this for a dev and test experience or to get the developers up to speed with using platform as a service. A company called [Synapse, which I’ll say 08:49], which is small, or young I should say, Boston based company that builds software and service web and mobile apps for consumer startups, they decided to use Pivotal Web Services for their platform because they wanted to just have the same develop experience through dev test and production, and it completely suited their needs. It gave them the flexibility in terms of how they built the application, it gave them the sizing requirements they needed etc. The other nice thing that they got out of it was the ability to deploy their particular application both in the public Cloud or in private Clouds that customers wanted to run. What they realized is that if they had customers who said, ‘Hey we really like your particular application, we like your service, but we want to run it in-house for whatever reason that we have,’ they had a very simple and easy way to say that ‘Hey, you just run Pivotal CF internally, we bring our code across, and it will work fine.’ A really interesting example there.

If you’ve ever wanted to have a play with Pivotal CF, you wondered how it looks, and what the experience is from a developer perspective, then Pivotal Web Services or PWS is the place to go. That’s run.pivotal.io. There’s a 60-day free trial. You don’t have to enter your credit card when you sign up for the free trial. You can have a bit of an experiment and see how you go. Hopefully you’ll be able to make something pretty cool and until then, talk to you later, and keep on building.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the All Things Pivotal podcast. If you enjoyed it, please share it with others. We love hearing your feedback, so please send any comments or suggestions to podcast@pivotal.io.

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CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

RESOURCES:

,

CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

PLAY EPISODE #15

 

RESOURCES:

Transcript

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the All Things Pivotal podcast, the podcast at the intersection of agile, cloud, and big data. Stay tuned for regular updates, technical deep dives, architecture discussions, and interviews. Please share your feedback with us by e-mailing podcast@pivotal.io.

Simon Elisha:

Hello everyone and welcome back to the All Things Pivotal podcast. Fantastic to have you back. My name is Simon Elisha. Good to have you with me again today. A quick and punchy podcast this week, but an interesting one nonetheless hopefully and answering a question that comes up quite commonly. Well, it’s really 2 questions. The first question is, how can I try out Pivotal Cloud Foundry really, really quickly without any set up time? Which often relates to my answer being, ‘Well have you heard of Pivotal Web Services?’ To which people say, ‘What is Pivotal Web Services?’ Also known as, PWS. Also known as P-Dubs.

Pivotal Web Services is a service available on the Web, funnily enough, at run.pivotal.io. It is a hosted version of Pivotal Cloud Foundry running on Amazon Web Services in the US. It provides a platform upon which you can use as a developer, push applications to it, organize your workspaces, and really use as a development platform or even as a production location for your applications. It is a fully-featured running version of Pivotal CF in the Cloud. Not surprisingly, that’s what Pivotal CF can do, but this provides a hosted version for you.

Let’s unpack this a little bit and have a look at what it is and why you might want to use it. The first thing that’s good to know is you can connect to run.pivotal.io straight away. You don’t need a credit card to start and you get a 60-day free trial. I’ll talk about what you get in that 60-day free trial shortly, but the good thing to know is you can go and try it straight away. Often when I’m talking to customers and they’re getting their toe in the water with platforms and service and they’re trying to understand what it is and they say, ‘Oh where can I just try and push an app or test something out?’ I say, ‘Hey go to Pivotal Web Services, it’s free, you can try it out, you can grab an application you’ve got on the shelf and just see what it’s like.’ They go, ‘Well that’s pretty cool, I can do it straight away.’ No friction in that happening.

In terms of what you can use on the platform, so we currently support apps written in Java, Grails, Play, Spring, Node.js, Ruby on Rails, Sinatra, Go, Python, or PHP. Any of those ones will automatically be discovered and [hey presto 02:37] CF push and away we go. If you’ve been listening to previous episodes you’ll know the magic of the CF push process. If however you need another language, you can use a Community Buildpack or you can even write a custom one yourself that will run on the platform as well. Obviously, if you’re running an application you may want to consume some services. You can choose from a variety of third party data bases, e-mail services, monitoring services, that exist in the Marketplace, that exist on Pivotal Cloud Foundry. I’ll run you through what some of those services are because there really is a nice selection available for you.

What you then do is you buy into those services within your application and Pivotal Cloud Foundry, and P-Dubs in particular, takes care of all the connection criteria or the buying in process or the credentials etc, which make it nice and easy. You may be saying, ‘Well hmm, what does this cost me to get access to this kind of platform?’ Well, it’s a really simple, simple model. It’s application centric and you pay 3 cents US per gig per hour. That’s the per hour cost is for the amount of memory used by the application to run. Now, with that 3 cents you get included your routing, so your traffic routing, your load balancing, you can up to 1 gig of ephemeral disk space on your app instances. You get free storage for your application files when they get pushed to the platform. You don’t pay for that storage cost at all. You get bandwidth both in and out, up to 2 terabytes of bandwidth. You get unified log streaming, which we’ll talk about and health management, which we’ll also talk about.

As you can imagine, this could be very cost-effective platform for dev test and production workloads because you’re only paying for what you use when you use it and you’re only paying at the application layer on a per memory basis. Now, there’s a really handy pricing tab on the Pivotal Web Services page that lets you put in how many app instances you’d need for your application and will punch out for you that cost on a per month basis for the hosting, which is really, really nice.

What are some of the things that we allow you to do with this platform? What are some of the benefits? As I mentioned, you get the 60-day free trial and the 60-day free trial, you get 2 gig of application memory, so it can run applications that consume up to 2 gig of aggregate memory. It can have up to 10 application services from the free tier of the Marketplace. This means you get to play with quite a lot of capability at very low cost, very, very easily.

Aside from pushing your app, which is yeah, nice and easy and something you want to do, what else do we do with this? Well, we can [elect 05:17] to have performance monitoring. In the developer console, which you can log into, you can see all your spaces, your applications and their status, how many services are bound to them etc. You can drill into them in more detail to see what they’re actually consuming. If you want even more detailed monitoring, so inside the application type monitoring, you can use New Relic for that and that’s a service that’s offered in the Marketplace. It has a zero touch configuration. For Java applications, you can basically [crank and bind 05:47] you New Relic service to your app very, very simply with basically no configuration. It’s amazing. For other languages like Ruby or Java Script, you have to the New Relic [agent 05:56] running, but it’s still a pretty trivial process to get it up and going.

Now, once your application is running, you probably want to make sure it keeps running. A normal desire to have. We have this thing called, The Health Manager. This is an automated system that monitors your application for you and if your application instances exit you to an error or something happens where the number of instances is less than the ones that you actually created when you did your CF push or CF Scale, the platform will automatically recover those particular instances for you. Obviously, the log will be updated to indicate that that took place. If you set up an application and you have 3 instances running, it will run them for you. If one of them fails, it will spin up another one for you and you’re good to go.

Another capability is, of course, the Unified Log Streaming. One of the features of Pivotal CF is the ability to bring logs together from multiple application instances into the one place. In PWS, we do the same thing. We have this streaming log API that will send all the information, all the components, for your application to the one location. You can tailor this interactively yourself or you can use a syslog drain too, once you have a third party tool you may like. Tools like, Splunk or Logstash etc. They’re all scoped by a unique application ID and an instance index, so they can correlate across multiple events and see how they all fit together, which is nice.

The system also has a really nice Web console, which is built for really agile developers to use. You jump in, you can see what applications are running, where, who started them, what’s going on. You can even connect your spacers with your CI pipeline to make sure that builds are going into the correct life cycle stage of being deployed appropriately as well. You can also see quotas and building across your spacers because you have access to organizations and spacers as well. We’ll talk about organizations and spacers in another episode.

What about from a services perspective? What are some of the services that we have available in the Marketplace? Well, it’s growing all the time. It’s a movable face, as I like to say. We have a number. I’ll just call out a few highlight ones. Things like, Searchify for search, BlazeMeter for load testing, Redis Cloud, which is an enterprise-class cache. We talked about caches a little while ago, ClearDB, which is a MySQL database service. We have Searchly, ElasticSearch. We have the Memcached [D 08:19] Cloud. We have SendGrid for sending e-mail, MongoLab for MongoDB as a service, New Relic obviously for access to performance criteria. RabbitMQ, so through Cloud AMQP, ElephantSQL, PostgreSQL as a service etc, etc. A good selection of services there are available to you to use.

It’s interesting seeing what people use this for. Often, customers who use this for a dev and test experience or to get the developers up to speed with using platform as a service. A company called [Synapse, which I’ll say 08:49], which is small, or young I should say, Boston based company that builds software and service web and mobile apps for consumer startups, they decided to use Pivotal Web Services for their platform because they wanted to just have the same develop experience through dev test and production, and it completely suited their needs. It gave them the flexibility in terms of how they built the application, it gave them the sizing requirements they needed etc. The other nice thing that they got out of it was the ability to deploy their particular application both in the public Cloud or in private Clouds that customers wanted to run. What they realized is that if they had customers who said, ‘Hey we really like your particular application, we like your service, but we want to run it in-house for whatever reason that we have,’ they had a very simple and easy way to say that ‘Hey, you just run Pivotal CF internally, we bring our code across, and it will work fine.’ A really interesting example there.

If you’ve ever wanted to have a play with Pivotal CF, you wondered how it looks, and what the experience is from a developer perspective, then Pivotal Web Services or PWS is the place to go. That’s run.pivotal.io. There’s a 60-day free trial. You don’t have to enter your credit card when you sign up for the free trial. You can have a bit of an experiment and see how you go. Hopefully you’ll be able to make something pretty cool and until then, talk to you later, and keep on building.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the All Things Pivotal podcast. If you enjoyed it, please share it with others. We love hearing your feedback, so please send any comments or suggestions to podcast@pivotal.io.

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CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

RESOURCES:

,

CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

RESOURCES:

,

CloudFoundry

When To Shave Yaks, Or Avoid It All Together

30 Gen , 2015  

featured-yak-shavingI’ve been seeing a common pattern in enterprises development groups recently: IT shops are creating their own Platform as a Service. They’ve built a shared, often cloud-like runtime used to support their custom written applications, the software used to run their business internally and externally. They’ve got their own platform. Many companies were forced to do this in past years because viable PaaSes that met their requirements didn’t exist; there’s all sorts of examples, perhaps most famously, Google and Netflix, each of whom had to build large scale, cloud-driven platforms to fit their business.

Each of these companies had to build their own platform many years ago to get their competitive advantage: the agility, speed, and cost controls that their in-house cloud platforms gave them pushed their businesses ahead. In those early days, you had to handcraft all the layers needed, often inventing them yourself with the beneficial and hard learnings that come from failure. Much of that knowledge has since been sucked out those companies and put into the commons for everyone to use. Apache Hadoop® is based on some of that secret sauce, the practices and technologies of DevOps emerged from the primordial, in-house cloud ooze, and Cloud Foundry was designed to learn from the custom platform at Google.

“Good job provisioning servers this year,” said no CEO ever in an annual review.

With that knowledge in the commons and in mature platform products, there’s little competitive advantage in building your own platform now from the bare-metal up. Instead, there’s more competitive advantage in selecting an off-the-shelf platform and focusing on your own applications. The applications are the actual code—the mobile apps, the business process, and all that stuff we used to call “business logic”—that you end-users and customers see and interact with. The application is where you differentiate from your competitors, not how you manage compute, networking, and storage.

Therefore, one would think it’d behove companies to focus most of their attention on application layer, not just the layers below it. Take a look at this recent chart from my former analyst firm 451 Research listing cloud related projects over the next two years:

Cloud Computing Total Opportunity - TIP Coud Wave 7 - Screenshot 2015-01-22 10.24.07
Source: “Reference Technology and Services Roadmap – Cloud Computing Wave 7,” 451 Research, Aug 2014

Shifting through all the anecdotes and the studies, you can tell that there’s a lot of raw infrastructure build-out going on. People are building IaaS, automation, and all the layers that operations staff needs to run their data centers. On the other hand, projects associated directly with writing the actual software (where the real business value is) tend to be further down the list. When I see this chart, the strategist in me sees the chance to leapfrog competition if only you can figure out the right technology to pogo-stick with.

Instead of taking time to build your own platform, just get an off the shelf one and move up the stack to the actual application. I’m fond of cheesy analogies involving going to the grocery store: it’s like you need to buy some milk and you’ve spent a month building a car when you could have just bought a car.

Why Does This Happen?

I’m interested in finding the causes of decisions in IT, and understanding those causes is more than just entertaining, it helps people change for the better, whether it’s learning from success or failure. So why is there this deep focus on building out raw infrastructure? Let’s look at some of the causes (with benefits), and then problems building your own platform can create.

Causes: “I Am A Unique Snowflake”

Most of the reasons companies end up building their own platforms revolve around a misunderstanding of how to best apply IT to making the business profitable. IT usually best serves the business by being close to the customer (or the core transaction the business performs), for example, working on the application layer. This is the layer that’s visible day-to-day and where the business can differentiate against competition. There are of course, legitimate reasons to build your own platform, but for the most part, the causes are variations on poorly aligning IT strategy to business strategy:

  • “Let’s build a private cloud.”  You want to pull back from public cloud, often from AWS. There are many reasons, sometimes competitive pressures (like if you’re in retail – do you want to run your business in your competitor’s data centers?), oftentimes the desire and need to fully control the stack and run in a single tenant mode.
  • “That’s what I do!” I’ve spoken with many sysadmin types over the years and, like any human, they want to do more of what they’re good at. Thanks to decades of IT Service Management and ITIL thinking, they’re good at building infrastructure and then providing controlled access to it. Little wonder they’d want to do the same in the cloud era. However, to switch back to an application developer mindset, that can seem a bit like “gold plating” as we used to call it in the Patterns days or “yak shaving” as the kids term it now.
  • The sins of our forefathers. Maybe you inherited this platform through M&A or portfolio consolidation – at organizations of any size, esp. large ones, you might end up with a hodge-podge of methods for delivering applications. This could be due to “shadow IT,” acquiring other companies (think of all the bank consolidation over the past few years, or dollar stores melding together – there’s lots of IT to consolidate), or even re-orging large divisions. You’re left dealing with problems someone else caused: the type of thing a lot of enterprise CIOs are forced to eat for breakfast (lunch and dinner!) each day.
  • The yak, it needs shaving. There are still instances, to be sure, where you need to build a platform from the ground up. Maybe you deal in secrets like spy agencies and military – those Palantir people seem to be growing in quiet with only the occasional moppy-headed CEO picture leaking out. People like Planet and Space X who are building out space likely have interesting unique needs. Even in this situation, you want to keep an eye on shared pool of brains in your industry (usually represented by open source efforts) and start to reap benefits from using a common platform.

Problems: “Now I’ve Got Two Problems”

The problems in building and running your own platform sprout from the first problem of “You own it, you build and run it.” not only do you need to staff (or pay for outsourcing) the development of your platform, but you’ll need to maintain a staff to keep it updated. This might be fine, but it also means more resources being spent on non-differentiating IT instead of building the actual applications used to run your business. The rest of the problems are variations on that theme:

  • Limited technology support limits innovation. Because you’ve built your own platform, you often only have resources to support one or two programming language well, let alone all sorts of middleware and databases. While this might have been of limited concern in the triarch days of Java/.Net/LAMP, as the bi-annual RedMonk programming language index consistently shows, we’re in a polyglot age where using the right language for the task is one way to achieve advantage. The same is true in other parts of the stack, like the data and analytics slices where options abound.
  • A self-ecosystem means you’re on your own. Your options are not only stymied when it comes to the internal components (languages and middleware) for your platform, but you’ll also limit your access to support tools (all that stuff in that makes up Geoffrey Moore’s “whole product”) like systems management and security tools, consulting, development tools (from IDEs to CI/CD and portfolio management tools the PMO folks need to allocate budget each year) and other third party services that often target industry standards rather than enterprise one-offs.
  • Not “extensible.” As a consequences of being a self-ecosystem, you may not be able to add new features, functionality, and frameworks as quickly as others. This is one of the main benefits of an vibrant open source community (or well funded and staffed closed “community”) around a platform: there are many people and organizations adding in new functionality each year that you get for “free.”
  • Ancient lore considered painful. Whereas your staff might have understood how it all worked for the first few years, as staff move to other projects or companies, you’ll often slowly forget how it all fit together and worked. Without a vibrant, multi-party set of eyeballs and brains on the project, consistently documenting the “lore” around the platform is difficult, resulting in what was once an understandable white-box turning into an impenetrable, gold-plated black box that’s more a painful riddle than a helpful tool. This often happens when you’ve inherited large chunks of your IT portfolio.
  • You’re now in the three-ring binder business. Another consequence of having your own platform is needing to educate new staff on its use, often in metaphorical or literal three ring binder run, internally funded training sessions. There’s no O’Reilly books to go buy and read, online docs, or StackExchange sites to ask questions in. You own the training. (Of course, this isn’t to dismiss training and learning, but rather enforce it: that time is better spent learning more valuable things than how to build and run a platform, like perfecting how you design and build the actual software used to delight your customers and run your business.)
  • Stuck in a “portability” cul-de-sac –  By virtue of owning a unique platform, your applications likely run best in your own platform, or, worse and more common, they only run in your platform. So you’ve created your own lock-in, a feat usually limited to multi-billion dollar, multinational vendors. Lock-in is a core taboo in IT strategy and one that guides much cloud think now-a-days in a beneficial way: as Gartner’s Eric Knipp put it recently, “[h]ybrid cloud requirements have made portability a higher priority, and having a cloud exit plan is mandatory.”
  • “Remember page 382 of that EULA your predecessor’s lawyers accepted five years ago?” While it can be a minor concern, licensing issues around components you use in your own platform might rear their head. Closed source enterprise databases and middleware are notorious for being prickly when it comes to the price to embed. There’s little guarantee that you can simply bring your own license to cloud scenarios, where-as newer PaaSes tend to have better success at sorted out these concerns.
  • Welcome to systems programming. Whereas you may be an expert at application development, once you’ve built and run your own platform you now have to become a systems programmer: understanding and coding up all the operations concerns for actually running the platform. This jump from application to systems development is not easy: those spooky kernel people in dad jeans don’t seem to think the same as the skinny jeans app folks.

“What Have the Romans Ever Done For Us?!”

Again, I feel like people have had to build these types platforms for a long time because there weren’t enough viable options. There’s a certain “dark ages” between the waning days of Java and .Net and the renaissance we have now with PaaS and other microservices-think driven platforms. Admittedly, there were bright-spots that benefited us all during these dark ages for platforms, like rails and the emergence of JavaScript as programmer WD-40 (that simple thing that seems to make everything easier and smoother), but it’s been a long time since there were viable options for off the shelf (or, now, “off the web”) platforms. Obviously, I’m biased being at Pivotal, but that chance to move our attention back up the stack, closer to the user is part of why I joined Pivotal. In Pivotal Cloud Foundry it feels like there’s a good platform, it feels like there’s a good platform, ready to do the drudgery work at the infrastructure level so companies can focus on more delightful (and profitable) uses of IT in the application layer.

Editor’s Note: Apache, Apache Hadoop, Hadoop, and the yellow elephant logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Apache Software Foundation in the United States and/or other countries.

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