CloudFoundry

Continuous Delivery Among the Donkeys

26 Feb , 2015  

I was recently asked to give a brief overview of the mainstream market for continuous integration and continuous deployment and how companies are using it. The audience was a mixture of HeavyBit portfolio companies and their customers. So, it provided a nice mix of sellers and buyers. Since this topic comes up all the time in Pivotal conversations, I thought it’d be worth going over here as well.

Carrots on Heads, Please

Source: (PBF Comics)[http://www.pbfcomics.com/253/]

Source: (PBF Comics)[http://www.pbfcomics.com/253/]

I’m often fascinated—if agog in wonderment—at what the “elite” of the tech world are doing, those “unicorns.” There’s even “horses” out there—high performing organizations that are keeping up with those unicorns. But, I’m most interested in the normal folks, “donkeys,” as I like to think of them. I like seeing how the donkeys are doing when they strap a carrot to their head and try to keep up with the unicorns.

If you’re the type of person who wants the benefits of Cloud Foundry (making sure you’re shaving the right yak, focusing on application development instead of infrastructure development), you’ll want the benefits of continuous delivery, namely, speeding up your software delivery pipeline by automating as much as possible from builds, to tests, and even promoting builds to production.

These are outcomes of doing CD. The overarching goal is to reduce the cycle time to get new features into production, helping you establish a feedback loop that you then use to guide the perfection of your software. That last part is key, and often “money left on the table” when organizations stop short of changing their process.

So, let’s take a look at a quick survey of studies on how CD is doing out there in donkey-land.

Yeah. Everyone Wants a Pony. Astute Question, Boss

When I was at 451 Research, we did two studies of the DevOps market, from a donkey perspective. The first study had 201 participants, the second 300. We achieved a good cross-industry mix, not just people in the technology world. There were plenty of horses and donkeys in there. One of the first questions we asked was around each company’s desires to speed up software deployment. That is a core benefit of DevOps (perhaps the core benefit), and certainly a core benefit of continuous delivery.

In aggregate, the answer was painfully obvious—of course people wanted to go faster. Everyone wants a pony! Sliced up by industry, things got a little more interesting:

There are obvious ones who want to speed up like retail, entertainment, and SaaS companies. Industries like transportation can seem weird until you realize that IT-driven companies like Fedex, UPS, or even Uber are in that category (which is to say, there’s tremendous competitive pressure for IT to move faster). On the low-end, it’s sort of depressing that health care is less interested (I know I’d certainly like more, interesting uses of software when I visit the doctor), and perhaps things like construction are not so surprising.

When I look at this chart it helps me triangulate what types of industries are most interested in using software to change how they do their business. Those industries on the left side are certainly high on the list of people who’d be interested in continuous delivery, one would assume.

The Job To Be Done: A Platform for Speedy Software Delivery

With the desire to speed up software delivery frequency, we’ve found the job to be done. Now, a job to be done is a fun way of describing the problem a product or service solves—what “job” does a customer “hire” a business to do? I hire a hamburger to (a.) fill me up, and, (b.) make me happy. In contrast, when I’m on a long road-trip, I might just “hire” a gas station hot dog drowning in pump-chilli to fill me up, but not really make me happy.

In the realm of continuous integration and continuous delivery, there’s a clear job to be done—creating the “pipeline” for packaging up, verifying, and then deploying software into production. That is, everything between writing code and operating it. Someone once suggested to me that DevOps was simply the evolution of continuous delivery, which, while not entirely accurate, is useful framing. In that sense, I think it’s good to use one of the older but still useful process studies from the DevOps world, the software delivery platform:

Originally published in 2012, it’s stood the test of time and even popped up in one of the more useful cloud books of last year, The Practice of Cloud System Administration. CI/CD plays a huge, if not necessary, role in this process. One key point is to think of structured platform—moving code through this “pipeline” requires a lot of standardization and discipline. The alternative of re-inventing the packaging and infrastructure layers each time is the wrong kind of chaos.

There’s another vital part missing from the diagram, though, usually not from the conversation around it—a feedback loop. In addition to just getting software out the door more frequently, the primary business benefit of continuous delivery and DevOps (you see how those two so neatly dance around with each other?) is access to oodles of feedback about how customers are using your software.  This is used to hone and modify your software to better fit what your customers want, and one presumes <hopes>, that it leads to making more money from them.

Adapting to this feedback loop is the “money on the table” when it comes to process. I see very few donkeys taking advantage of those feedback loops, and the horses and unicorns even struggle with changing their process. Surveys and anecdotes alike show that people feel like things are often going wrong with their modern IT projects and often blame doing too little when it comes to change.

Speaking of Failure: CI/CD Use is Low in Donkey-land

Getting down to actual tool-usage, surveys from 451 and others, show a consistently lower use of CI/CD tools than you’d expect:

Here, you see the sad donut and some confirming, but encouraging survey data from DZone.

The sad donut shows that somewhere between 25–30% of the respondents are using CD tools like Jenkins, Bamboo, or hosted CI/CD services. There is a seemingly positive 35%, let’s call it, who are creating their own CD platforms. In past years, “rolling your own” when it came to service delivery platforms was needed and there was no other option. But, the technology is mature at this point, calling into question the strategic worth of DIY’ing your continious delivery platform. Effort spent creating your own CD tool is probably better spent on, you know, the actual software your customers use. The most distressing part of the donut is the near 30% of respondents who are doing nothing. I call this “distressing,” because, one, I like to be hyperbolic to keep myself awake, and, two, because CD as an idea and technology has been around a long time, well over five years. It is hard for me to imagine a software development team that wouldn’t benefit from it.

Now that I don’t work at an analyst shop, I can freely mix and match research data. So, I wanted to pull in some additional survey results on CD. On the right, you can see a year over year comparison of a DZone study, first listing companies who believed they did CD and then, according to a pretty good criteria based on orginization indicators laid out by Martin Fowler, judging which of those respondents are actually doing CD. Again, the results are somewhat shocking, but help triangulate the sad donut.

The Pipeline Is Your Platform, Perfect It!

For ease-of-thinking and strategic application, I wanted to simplify the software delivery platform diagram a bit. So, here it is with Pivotal colors!

There are a few things to think about:

  1. The most valuable part of this process is actually a handful of pixels—the first few steps where you’re creating the software used to help run your business. The feedback loop is clearly key to getting the right specifications in place and making sure you’re writing software that is actually effective. I believe these first two boxes are where most companies—most donkeys to be sure—should spend the majority of their effort (and yes, one should bundle test/verify in there, that’s always nice…).
  2. Over recent years, we’ve spent most of our time as an industry focused on the rest of the boxes, especially the infrastructure platform and production concerns boxes. Topics like cloud, OpenStack, and containers have made this area a churning pool of excitement. When I was an analyst and doing cloud strategy, I came across enterprises all the time who wanted to build their own platforms out of piece parts. For some—often the unicorns—it makes sense, or at least it used to. For others, it’s probably gold-plating and a mis-application of time and money. Unlike in recent years, there’s are so many “off the web” (to morph the old OTC idea) infrastructure parts that you’re likely better just using one of those rather than letting your people go crazy with the always entertaining task of building a platform.
  3. You also need to be on the look-out for fat boy scouts in this pipeline. If you lead an exciting enough life that you’ve read The Goal (a “business novel”), you’ll hopefully recall the lesson of the fat boy scout—your line of marching boy scouts will only be as fast as the slowest marcher. It follows that optimizing anything else before addressing bottlenecks is a waste of time. Focus on analyzing the whole process (i.e., the pipeline) and ruthlessly remove the bottlenecks. If you want an IT nerd version of The Goal, check out the more recent The Phoenix Project.

All of this raises a larger point. While we might think of all of this as Agile and the sort of cowboy codery that’s often associated with it…there’s actually a tremendous amount of discipline, process, and careful work involved in running a business with a continuous delivery engine. It’s much more than just using a tool. It relies on building out and perfecting the entire pipeline. The rewards are high, though—getting software out the door faster, making customers happier, which hopefully leads to more profits.

Let’s Fix the Sad Donut

From the anemic, but slowly beefing up, usage of CD we’re seeing out there it’s clear that we can do better as an industry. Almost five years after the publication of the Continuous Delivery book, there’s a lot of that half full glass to fill. In the meantime, the growing interest in developing mobile applications, cloud native applications,12 factor style applications, DevOps, and cloud in general has sparked a renewed interest in the otherwise sleepy,but always valuable, corner of the IT world, software development. Software development is suddenly very interesting and the focus of lots of great work and innovation from companies large and small. Indeed, HeavyBit’s investment thesis is that development tools as a market is fast becoming a big deal again; a strategic point that Pivotal obviously believes as well. Part of the goal of Pivotal Cloud Foundry is to provide as much as possible in the nature of structured platforms to slim up all those fat boy scouts in the pipeline. While the label “Platform-as-a-Service” has been and is certainly one that applies, we prefer to think of what we offer as a set of tools that helps our customer perfect the software delivery pipeline, that is: a platform.

Recommended Reading:

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CloudFoundry

Why Services are Essential to Your Platform as a Service

27 Gen , 2015  

For most organizations, there is a constant battle between the need to rapidly develop and deploy software while effectively managing the environment and deployment process. As a developer, you struggle with the ability to move new applications to production, and regular provisioning of support services can take weeks, if not months. IT operations, on the other hand, is balancing the backlog of new services requests with the need to keep all the existing (growing) services up and patched. Each side is challenged with meeting the needs of an ever-changing business.

What are Services?

Service is defined as “an act of helpful activity; help, aid.” A Service should make your life easier. Pivotal believes that Platform as a Service (PaaS) should make administrator’s and developer’s lives easier, not harder. Services available through the Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform allow resources to be easily provisioned on-demand. These services are typically middleware, frameworks, and other “components” used by developers when creating their applications.

Services extend a PaaS to become a flexible platform for all types of applications. Services can be as unique as an organization or an application requires. They can bind applications to databases or allow the integration of continuous delivery tools into a platform. Services, especially user-provided services, can also wrap other applications, like a company’s ERP back-end or a package tracking API. The accessibility of Services through a single platform ensures developers and IT operators can truly be agile.

Extensibility Through a Services-Enabled Platform

The availability of Services within the platform are one of the most powerful and extensible features of Pivotal Cloud Foundry. A broad ecosystem of software can run and be managed from within the Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform, and this ensures that enterprises get the functionality they need.

Robust functionality from a single source reduces the time spent on configuration and monitoring. It also has the added benefit of improving scalability and time-to-production. Services allow administrators to provide pre-defined database and middleware services, and this gives developers the ability to rapidly deploy a software product from a menu of options without the typical slow and manual provisioning process. This is also done in a consistent and supportable way.

Managed Services Ensure Simple Provisioning

One of the features that sets Pivotal Cloud Foundry apart from other platforms is the extent of the integration of Managed Services. These Services are managed and operated ‘as a Service,’ and this means they are automatically configured upon request. The provisioning process also incorporates full lifecycle management support, like software updates and patching.

Automation removes the overhead from developers, who are often saddled with service configuration responsibility. It makes administrators’ lives easier and addresses security risks by standardizing how services are configured and used—no more one-off weirdness in configuration. The result is true self-provisioning.

A few of the Pivotal Services, like RabbitMQ, are provided in a highly available capacity. This means that when the Service is provisioned it is automatically clustered to provide high availability. This relieves much of the administrative overhead of deploying and managing database and middleware Services, as well as the significant effort of correctly configuring a cluster.

Broad Accessibility With User-Provided Services

In addition to the integrated and Managed Services, Pivotal Cloud Foundry supports a broad range of User-Provided Services. User-Provided Services are services that are currently not available through the Services Marketplace, meaning the Services are managed externally from the platform, but are still accessible by the applications.

The User-Provided Services are completely accessible by the application, but are created outside of the platform. This Service extension enables database Services, like Oracle and DB2 Mainframe, to be easily bound to an application, guaranteeing access to all the Services needed by applications.

Flexible Integration Model

Access to all services, both managed and user-provided, is handled via the Service Broker API within the Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform. This module provides a flexible, RESTful API and allows service authors (those that create the services) to provide self-provisioning services to developers.

The Service Broker is not opinionated. It can be crafted to suit the unique needs of the environment and organization. The Service Broker functionality ensures the extensibility of the platform and also allows administrators to create a framework that developers can operate within, supporting agile deployments. This framework provides consistency and reproducibility within the platform. It also has the added benefit of limiting code changes required by applications as they move through the development lifecycle.

As an example of the customization capabilities, a customer created a Service Broker that not only adjusts the network topology when an application is deployed to an environment, it also adjusts the security attributes. An application could have fairly open access to an organization’s raw market material, but access to a core billing system would be limited and privileged.

Security Integrated into Each Service

The Service Broker gives administrators the ability to define access control of services. Service-level access control ensures developers and applications only have access to the environment and service necessary. When a Service is fully managed, credentials are encapsulated in the Service Broker. The result is that passwords no longer need to be passed across different teams and resources, but instead are managed by a single administrator.

Finally, the Service Broker provides full auditing of all services. Auditing simply keeps track of what Services have been created or changed, all through the API. This type of audit trail is great if you are an administrator and trying to figure out who last made changes to a critical database service.

Self-Service for the Masses

Managed Services are available for download from Pivotal Network, and are added by an administrator to the platform. All Services available within the platform are accessible to developers via the Marketplace. The Marketplace allows self-provisioning of software as it is needed by developers and applications.

Services from Pivotal like RabbitMQ, Redis, and Pivotal Tracker, as well as popular third-party software, like Jenkins Enterprise by CloudBees and Datastax Enterprise Cassandra, are available immediately. The Marketplace provides a complete self-service catalog, speeding up the development cycle.

Services

Services View in Pivotal Network

The breadth and availability of Services ensures that operators provide development teams access to the resources that they need, when they need them. A developer, who is writing a new application that requires a MySQL database, can easily select and provision MySQL from the Marketplace. The platform then creates the unique credentials for the database and applies those to the application.

Rapid Time to Market with Mobile Services

The expansive Services catalog extends to the Pivotal Mobile Services, announced in August 2014. These mobile backend services allow organizations to rapidly develop and deploy mobile applications. The accessibility of mobile backend services through the Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform ensures that developers are able to easily build new mobile applications leveraging capabilities such as push notifications and data sync.

Essentials of a Services-Enabled Platform

Developers want to quickly deploy a database or middleware service, without a slow and manual provisioning process. IT operators want to be able to quickly meet the growing requests for new services, while also securely managing a complex environment. Provisioning Services through a PaaS is the natural solution to balancing the needs of the developers and IT operators, all while meeting the needs of the business.

A PaaS should provide simple access to full lifecycle management for services—from click-through provisioning to patch management and high availability. At Pivotal we have seen tremendous success with the release of services based on CloudBees and DataStax. The Pivotal Services ecosystem continues to grow, as does the growing capabilities of the Service Broker. This growth ensures the Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform will continue to meet the needs of organizations.

Recommended Reading:

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PaaS

Jenkins Operations and Continuous Delivery @Scale with CloudBees Jenkins Enterprise

10 Dic , 2014  

Continuous Delivery @Scale 

Lately, there has been a tremendous buzz in the Jenkins open source community about the release of the Workflow feature. The Workflow feature enables organizations to build complex, enterprise-ready continuous delivery pipelines. I am particularly excited as native support for pipelines in Jenkins was one of the most common requests I have encountered from enterprise (and small) users. You can read about the OSS Workflow GA announcement here.

I am pleased to announce that CloudBees is delivering additional features built on top of OSS Jenkins that help enterprises use the Workflow features to implement continuous delivery pipelines.

The Workflow Stage View feature helps teams visualise the flow and performance of their pipelines. So, for example, a manager can look at a pipeline and easily drill into the performance of a particular stage or a developer can look at the pipeline and see how far in the pipelines their commits have traversed.

The Checkpoint feature enables recovery from both infrastructure or Jenkins failures. In the event of a failure, the pipeline can be started from any of the previous successful checkpoints, instead of from the beginning. This is extremely valuable in the case of long-running builds that may take hours or days to run. 

Jenkins Workflow is a technological leap to help organizations build out continuous delivery pipelines and I urge you to check it out. 

Jenkins Operations @Scale 
Late last year, we announced Jenkins Operations Center by CloudBees – a game changer in the world of Jenkins. It acts as the operations hub for multiple Jenkins in an organization, letting them easily share resources like slaves and security.

I am happy to announce the release of a new version of Jenkins Operations Center by CloudBees – version 1.6. This release has two significant features: 

Cluster Operations simplifies the management of Jenkins by allowing one operational command to simultaneously act on a group of Jenkins masters, versus administering individual masters. Cluster Operations includes actions such as: starting/ restarting client masters, installing and upgrading plugins and upgrading the Jenkins core.

CloudBees Jenkins Analytics provides operational insight into Jenkins performance. Performance aspects include Jenkins-specific build and executor performance across a cluster of masters and standard JVM-based performance metrics. CloudBees Jenkins Analytics also make the monitoring of multiple masters easier by adding a number of new graphs that show performance for build queues and persistence for views across master restarts. The feature also includes new visualization graphs built in Kibana and ElasticSearch, delivering the ability to quickly drill down into individual client performances.  

Performance Analytics

Build Analytics

Join our webinar 10 December 2014 about Workflow, and one on Jenkins Operations @Scale on 17 December to learn more. 

More information: 
Product pages
Jenkins Operations Center Documentation 
Jenkins Enterprise by CloudBees Documentation
Talk to sales for Jenkins Enterprise by CloudBees, Jenkins Operations Center.

– Harpreet Singh
vice president, product management
CloudBees

The post Jenkins Operations and Continuous Delivery @Scale with CloudBees Jenkins Enterprise appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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Uncategorized

The Cloud Foundry Jenkins Plugin

18 Nov , 2014  

Jenkins Cloud Foundry PluginThere’s a lot of interest in using Stackato in conjunction with continuous integration tools, and the most popular of those tools is Jenkins CI. Until now, the only ways to deploy your applications to Cloud Foundry or Stackato from a Jenkins build were to:

read more

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CloudFoundry

This Month in PaaS: Top Headlines for Platform as a Service

31 Ott , 2014  

This Month in PaaSOctober was a sprint in the Platform as a Service space—there was no sign of slowing down.

Not only has the next wave of companies proved the benefits of PaaS and the devops movement, there is a tremendous amount of Pivotal CF and Cloud Foundry technology news for containers like Docker, mobile back end services, microservices, Eclipse integration, and Jenkins CI as a service. In addition, this was the month that OpenStack’s co-founder joined Pivotal as Field CTO, Spring released Spring Cloud (with Cloud Foundry bits), and, in case you missed it, Pivotal CF 1.3 became generally available.

Here is Pivotal’s inaugural round-up of This Month in PaaS—16 stories to keep us all up to speed.

This Month in Platform as a Service 

The Economics of IaaS causes Application Demand and PaaS to Skyrocket

Efficiency and cost reduction on the part of IaaS is leading to an increase in application creation and consumption—this will drive PaaS adoption. The argument, made by CIO Magazine Advisor and ActiveState VP, Bernard Golden, summarizes what many others in the industry believe is happening.

Spring Cloud 1.0.0.M1 Available

Spring Cloud provides common patterns for distributed systems, covering configuration, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy, control bus, one-time tokens, and much more. This release helps Java developers become quickly productive on Cloud Foundry.

Ubuntu Release supports Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, and Docker

Upon joining the Cloud Foundry Advisory Board, Canonical sent a signal to the market. In its latest release, Ubuntu 14.10, capabilities support Metal as a Service (MaaS). This means any cluster of physical machines can be transformed into a scalable platform for Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, or Hadoop.

Cloud Foundry’s Evolution, Docker, and More: An Interview with Pivotal’s James Watters

CenturyLink Labs’ Lucas Carlson, sat down to interview Pivotal’s James Watters. In the conversation, they cover the long range and recent history of Cloud Foundry, microservices, Deigo, containers, Docker, ecosystem maturity, and more. Watters points out the fact that ISVs are saying they need to support it.

Microservices and PaaS—Part IV

Recently, members of the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board began a series on this topic, and began with the premise that a single war file and monolithic application is no way to deliver modern cloud services. This article explains how PaaS features simplify and support microservices development.

Are Docker Containers Essential to PaaS?

In this post from Information Week, pundit Charles Babcock, summarizes a panel he moderated on the topic at INTEROP. The PaaS panel covered Linux containers, and the four panelists gave their thoughts on the importance of Docker. Interestingly, they all backed the importance of these containers.

Shadow IT Risk and Reward

While shadow IT, as a concept, has been around a while. It is still one of the more important, strategic considerations for rolling your own PaaS. This article is one of the more thorough reviews of the behaviors driving the trend, and it captures relevant statistics as well as pitfalls and approaches.

GE’s Big Agile Bet

GE has moved from 2 day to 20 minute builds. In this post from DevOps.com, the author highlights a presentation from DevOps Enterprise Summit where GE’s Alan Schachtely presented. He explains how GE has shifted the culture of 15,000 software engineers to a devops mindset with lean, agile principles.

The New Mobile-Cloud Enterprise

This article, published by TechCrunch, covers some of the recent acquisitions and product launches in the mobile backend as a service space, including the launch of Pivotal CF Mobile Services. As PaaS reaches to be “Linux of the Cloud,” enterprises need more mobile apps.

This Month in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Now Available: Cloud Foundry Foundation Bylaws, Governance, Membership

Together, Cloud Foundry Foundation members IBM, HP, EMC, SAP, Centurylink, VMware, Intel, ActiveState, Canonical, Docker and others have moved past the momentum stage and produced a Code of Conduct, Bylaws, Governance Policy, Membership Agreement, Intellectual Property Policy, and more.

General Availability of Pivotal CF 1.3

Just as October was arriving, we announced the general availability of Pivotal CF 1.3. In under a year, the engineering team has made four releases. In this release, enhancements included multiple availability zones, multiple networks, security groups, on-demand access to enterprise Hadoop, and more.

Cloud Foundry’s Container Technology: A Garden Overview

Pivotal Engineer, Glyn Normington, develops container technology for Cloud Foundry. In this post, he explains the Cloud Foundry container technology. The Garden architecture has a platform agnostic front end and a platform-specific backend based on Linux. Glyn covers namespaces, networking, and more.

Co-Founder of Piston Cloud, OpenStack Joins Pivotal to Focus on Cloud Foundry

This month, Pivotal announced a new Field CTO for Cloud Foundry. Joshua McKenty explains how OpenStack rose to dominate the market and outlines a vision for where Cloud Foundry is heading. After giving a brief history of his own journey to the cloud, McKenty also explains why he is excited.

How shrebo, the Sharing Economy Platform, Innovates with Cloud Foundry

In this post, we had the opportunity to do interview the CTO of shrebo, a company who has built SaaS APIs on the Cloud Foundry platform with Python/Django. The CTO, a 20 year veteran who has worked at IBM, SAS, and Credit Suisse, explains his needs, architecture, development benefits, and much more.

How to Continuously Deploy Code with Jenkins and Pivotal CF

After launching a partnership with Cloudbees in September, this blog post explains how the Jenkins Enterprise service is deployed via Pivotal CF Ops Manager. The process is very simple and streamlined—setting up master and slave, registration of trial license, and integration.

Service Management Through Cloud Foundry Eclipse

In this post, Pivotal Engineer, Nieraj Singh, explains the Cloud Foundry Eclipse plug-in, a joint collaboration between Pivotal and IBM. He explains how to install the plug-in, create a server instance with Pivotal Web Services, create service instances, and bind them to applications.

All Things Pivotal Podcast—Now Available

When Pivotal’s Simon Elisha started the AWS Podcast back in 2011, it became a regular part of the listening “diet” of thousands of people in over 100 countries to understand the radical changes in how IT was being consumed & delivered. Now, Simon’s dialogue is available again under the All Things Pivotal Podcast.

Upcoming PaaS Events 2014

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CloudFoundry

This Month in PaaS: Top Headlines for Platform as a Service

31 Ott , 2014  

This Month in PaaSOctober was a sprint in the Platform as a Service space—there was no sign of slowing down.

Not only has the next wave of companies proved the benefits of PaaS and the devops movement, there is a tremendous amount of Pivotal CF and Cloud Foundry technology news for containers like Docker, mobile back end services, microservices, Eclipse integration, and Jenkins CI as a service. In addition, this was the month that OpenStack’s co-founder joined Pivotal as Field CTO, Spring released Spring Cloud (with Cloud Foundry bits), and, in case you missed it, Pivotal CF 1.3 became generally available.

Here is Pivotal’s inaugural round-up of This Month in PaaS—16 stories to keep us all up to speed.

This Month in Platform as a Service 

The Economics of IaaS causes Application Demand and PaaS to Skyrocket

Efficiency and cost reduction on the part of IaaS is leading to an increase in application creation and consumption—this will drive PaaS adoption. The argument, made by CIO Magazine Advisor and ActiveState VP, Bernard Golden, summarizes what many others in the industry believe is happening.

Spring Cloud 1.0.0.M1 Available

Spring Cloud provides common patterns for distributed systems, covering configuration, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy, control bus, one-time tokens, and much more. This release helps Java developers become quickly productive on Cloud Foundry.

Ubuntu Release supports Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, and Docker

Upon joining the Cloud Foundry Advisory Board, Canonical sent a signal to the market. In its latest release, Ubuntu 14.10, capabilities support Metal as a Service (MaaS). This means any cluster of physical machines can be transformed into a scalable platform for Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, or Hadoop.

Cloud Foundry’s Evolution, Docker, and More: An Interview with Pivotal’s James Watters

CenturyLink Labs’ Lucas Carlson, sat down to interview Pivotal’s James Watters. In the conversation, they cover the long range and recent history of Cloud Foundry, microservices, Deigo, containers, Docker, ecosystem maturity, and more. Watters points out the fact that ISVs are saying they need to support it.

Microservices and PaaS—Part IV

Recently, members of the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board began a series on this topic, and began with the premise that a single war file and monolithic application is no way to deliver modern cloud services. This article explains how PaaS features simplify and support microservices development.

Are Docker Containers Essential to PaaS?

In this post from Information Week, pundit Charles Babcock, summarizes a panel he moderated on the topic at INTEROP. The PaaS panel covered Linux containers, and the four panelists gave their thoughts on the importance of Docker. Interestingly, they all backed the importance of these containers.

Shadow IT Risk and Reward

While shadow IT, as a concept, has been around a while. It is still one of the more important, strategic considerations for rolling your own PaaS. This article is one of the more thorough reviews of the behaviors driving the trend, and it captures relevant statistics as well as pitfalls and approaches.

GE’s Big Agile Bet

GE has moved from 2 day to 20 minute builds. In this post from DevOps.com, the author highlights a presentation from DevOps Enterprise Summit where GE’s Alan Schachtely presented. He explains how GE has shifted the culture of 15,000 software engineers to a devops mindset with lean, agile principles.

The New Mobile-Cloud Enterprise

This article, published by TechCrunch, covers some of the recent acquisitions and product launches in the mobile backend as a service space, including the launch of Pivotal CF Mobile Services. As PaaS reaches to be “Linux of the Cloud,” enterprises need more mobile apps.

This Month in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Now Available: Cloud Foundry Foundation Bylaws, Governance, Membership

Together, Cloud Foundry Foundation members IBM, HP, EMC, SAP, Centurylink, VMware, Intel, ActiveState, Canonical, Docker and others have moved past the momentum stage and produced a Code of Conduct, Bylaws, Governance Policy, Membership Agreement, Intellectual Property Policy, and more.

General Availability of Pivotal CF 1.3

Just as October was arriving, we announced the general availability of Pivotal CF 1.3. In under a year, the engineering team has made four releases. In this release, enhancements included multiple availability zones, multiple networks, security groups, on-demand access to enterprise Hadoop, and more.

Cloud Foundry’s Container Technology: A Garden Overview

Pivotal Engineer, Glyn Normington, develops container technology for Cloud Foundry. In this post, he explains the Cloud Foundry container technology. The Garden architecture has a platform agnostic front end and a platform-specific backend based on Linux. Glyn covers namespaces, networking, and more.

Co-Founder of Piston Cloud, OpenStack Joins Pivotal to Focus on Cloud Foundry

This month, Pivotal announced a new Field CTO for Cloud Foundry. Joshua McKenty explains how OpenStack rose to dominate the market and outlines a vision for where Cloud Foundry is heading. After giving a brief history of his own journey to the cloud, McKenty also explains why he is excited.

How shrebo, the Sharing Economy Platform, Innovates with Cloud Foundry

In this post, we had the opportunity to do interview the CTO of shrebo, a company who has built SaaS APIs on the Cloud Foundry platform with Python/Django. The CTO, a 20 year veteran who has worked at IBM, SAS, and Credit Suisse, explains his needs, architecture, development benefits, and much more.

How to Continuously Deploy Code with Jenkins and Pivotal CF

After launching a partnership with Cloudbees in September, this blog post explains how the Jenkins Enterprise service is deployed via Pivotal CF Ops Manager. The process is very simple and streamlined—setting up master and slave, registration of trial license, and integration.

Service Management Through Cloud Foundry Eclipse

In this post, Pivotal Engineer, Nieraj Singh, explains the Cloud Foundry Eclipse plug-in, a joint collaboration between Pivotal and IBM. He explains how to install the plug-in, create a server instance with Pivotal Web Services, create service instances, and bind them to applications.

All Things Pivotal Podcast—Now Available

When Pivotal’s Simon Elisha started the AWS Podcast back in 2011, it became a regular part of the listening “diet” of thousands of people in over 100 countries to understand the radical changes in how IT was being consumed & delivered. Now, Simon’s dialogue is available again under the All Things Pivotal Podcast.

Upcoming PaaS Events 2014

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CloudFoundry

This Month in PaaS: Top Headlines for Platform as a Service

31 Ott , 2014  

This Month in PaaSOctober was a sprint in the Platform as a Service space—there was no sign of slowing down.

Not only has the next wave of companies proved the benefits of PaaS and the devops movement, there is a tremendous amount of Pivotal CF and Cloud Foundry technology news for containers like Docker, mobile back end services, microservices, Eclipse integration, and Jenkins CI as a service. In addition, this was the month that OpenStack’s co-founder joined Pivotal as Field CTO, Spring released Spring Cloud (with Cloud Foundry bits), and, in case you missed it, Pivotal CF 1.3 became generally available.

Here is Pivotal’s inaugural round-up of This Month in PaaS—16 stories to keep us all up to speed.

This Month in Platform as a Service 

The Economics of IaaS causes Application Demand and PaaS to Skyrocket

Efficiency and cost reduction on the part of IaaS is leading to an increase in application creation and consumption—this will drive PaaS adoption. The argument, made by CIO Magazine Advisor and ActiveState VP, Bernard Golden, summarizes what many others in the industry believe is happening.

Spring Cloud 1.0.0.M1 Available

Spring Cloud provides common patterns for distributed systems, covering configuration, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy, control bus, one-time tokens, and much more. This release helps Java developers become quickly productive on Cloud Foundry.

Ubuntu Release supports Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, and Docker

Upon joining the Cloud Foundry Advisory Board, Canonical sent a signal to the market. In its latest release, Ubuntu 14.10, capabilities support Metal as a Service (MaaS). This means any cluster of physical machines can be transformed into a scalable platform for Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, or Hadoop.

Cloud Foundry’s Evolution, Docker, and More: An Interview with Pivotal’s James Watters

CenturyLink Labs’ Lucas Carlson, sat down to interview Pivotal’s James Watters. In the conversation, they cover the long range and recent history of Cloud Foundry, microservices, Deigo, containers, Docker, ecosystem maturity, and more. Watters points out the fact that ISVs are saying they need to support it.

Microservices and PaaS—Part IV

Recently, members of the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board began a series on this topic, and began with the premise that a single war file and monolithic application is no way to deliver modern cloud services. This article explains how PaaS features simplify and support microservices development.

Are Docker Containers Essential to PaaS?

In this post from Information Week, pundit Charles Babcock, summarizes a panel he moderated on the topic at INTEROP. The PaaS panel covered Linux containers, and the four panelists gave their thoughts on the importance of Docker. Interestingly, they all backed the importance of these containers.

Shadow IT Risk and Reward

While shadow IT, as a concept, has been around a while. It is still one of the more important, strategic considerations for rolling your own PaaS. This article is one of the more thorough reviews of the behaviors driving the trend, and it captures relevant statistics as well as pitfalls and approaches.

GE’s Big Agile Bet

GE has moved from 2 day to 20 minute builds. In this post from DevOps.com, the author highlights a presentation from DevOps Enterprise Summit where GE’s Alan Schachtely presented. He explains how GE has shifted the culture of 15,000 software engineers to a devops mindset with lean, agile principles.

The New Mobile-Cloud Enterprise

This article, published by TechCrunch, covers some of the recent acquisitions and product launches in the mobile backend as a service space, including the launch of Pivotal CF Mobile Services. As PaaS reaches to be “Linux of the Cloud,” enterprises need more mobile apps.

This Month in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Now Available: Cloud Foundry Foundation Bylaws, Governance, Membership

Together, Cloud Foundry Foundation members IBM, HP, EMC, SAP, Centurylink, VMware, Intel, ActiveState, Canonical, Docker and others have moved past the momentum stage and produced a Code of Conduct, Bylaws, Governance Policy, Membership Agreement, Intellectual Property Policy, and more.

General Availability of Pivotal CF 1.3

Just as October was arriving, we announced the general availability of Pivotal CF 1.3. In under a year, the engineering team has made four releases. In this release, enhancements included multiple availability zones, multiple networks, security groups, on-demand access to enterprise Hadoop, and more.

Cloud Foundry’s Container Technology: A Garden Overview

Pivotal Engineer, Glyn Normington, develops container technology for Cloud Foundry. In this post, he explains the Cloud Foundry container technology. The Garden architecture has a platform agnostic front end and a platform-specific backend based on Linux. Glyn covers namespaces, networking, and more.

Co-Founder of Piston Cloud, OpenStack Joins Pivotal to Focus on Cloud Foundry

This month, Pivotal announced a new Field CTO for Cloud Foundry. Joshua McKenty explains how OpenStack rose to dominate the market and outlines a vision for where Cloud Foundry is heading. After giving a brief history of his own journey to the cloud, McKenty also explains why he is excited.

How shrebo, the Sharing Economy Platform, Innovates with Cloud Foundry

In this post, we had the opportunity to do interview the CTO of shrebo, a company who has built SaaS APIs on the Cloud Foundry platform with Python/Django. The CTO, a 20 year veteran who has worked at IBM, SAS, and Credit Suisse, explains his needs, architecture, development benefits, and much more.

How to Continuously Deploy Code with Jenkins and Pivotal CF

After launching a partnership with Cloudbees in September, this blog post explains how the Jenkins Enterprise service is deployed via Pivotal CF Ops Manager. The process is very simple and streamlined—setting up master and slave, registration of trial license, and integration.

Service Management Through Cloud Foundry Eclipse

In this post, Pivotal Engineer, Nieraj Singh, explains the Cloud Foundry Eclipse plug-in, a joint collaboration between Pivotal and IBM. He explains how to install the plug-in, create a server instance with Pivotal Web Services, create service instances, and bind them to applications.

All Things Pivotal Podcast—Now Available

When Pivotal’s Simon Elisha started the AWS Podcast back in 2011, it became a regular part of the listening “diet” of thousands of people in over 100 countries to understand the radical changes in how IT was being consumed & delivered. Now, Simon’s dialogue is available again under the All Things Pivotal Podcast.

Upcoming PaaS Events 2014

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CloudFoundry

This Month in PaaS: Top Headlines for Platform as a Service

31 Ott , 2014  

This Month in PaaSOctober was a sprint in the Platform as a Service space—there was no sign of slowing down.

Not only has the next wave of companies proved the benefits of PaaS and the devops movement, there is a tremendous amount of Pivotal CF and Cloud Foundry technology news for containers like Docker, mobile back end services, microservices, Eclipse integration, and Jenkins CI as a service. In addition, this was the month that OpenStack’s co-founder joined Pivotal as Field CTO, Spring released Spring Cloud (with Cloud Foundry bits), and, in case you missed it, Pivotal CF 1.3 became generally available.

Here is Pivotal’s inaugural round-up of This Month in PaaS—16 stories to keep us all up to speed.

This Month in Platform as a Service 

The Economics of IaaS causes Application Demand and PaaS to Skyrocket

Efficiency and cost reduction on the part of IaaS is leading to an increase in application creation and consumption—this will drive PaaS adoption. The argument, made by CIO Magazine Advisor and ActiveState VP, Bernard Golden, summarizes what many others in the industry believe is happening.

Spring Cloud 1.0.0.M1 Available

Spring Cloud provides common patterns for distributed systems, covering configuration, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy, control bus, one-time tokens, and much more. This release helps Java developers become quickly productive on Cloud Foundry.

Ubuntu Release supports Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, and Docker

Upon joining the Cloud Foundry Advisory Board, Canonical sent a signal to the market. In its latest release, Ubuntu 14.10, capabilities support Metal as a Service (MaaS). This means any cluster of physical machines can be transformed into a scalable platform for Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, or Hadoop.

Cloud Foundry’s Evolution, Docker, and More: An Interview with Pivotal’s James Watters

CenturyLink Labs’ Lucas Carlson, sat down to interview Pivotal’s James Watters. In the conversation, they cover the long range and recent history of Cloud Foundry, microservices, Deigo, containers, Docker, ecosystem maturity, and more. Watters points out the fact that ISVs are saying they need to support it.

Microservices and PaaS—Part IV

Recently, members of the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board began a series on this topic, and began with the premise that a single war file and monolithic application is no way to deliver modern cloud services. This article explains how PaaS features simplify and support microservices development.

Are Docker Containers Essential to PaaS?

In this post from Information Week, pundit Charles Babcock, summarizes a panel he moderated on the topic at INTEROP. The PaaS panel covered Linux containers, and the four panelists gave their thoughts on the importance of Docker. Interestingly, they all backed the importance of these containers.

Shadow IT Risk and Reward

While shadow IT, as a concept, has been around a while. It is still one of the more important, strategic considerations for rolling your own PaaS. This article is one of the more thorough reviews of the behaviors driving the trend, and it captures relevant statistics as well as pitfalls and approaches.

GE’s Big Agile Bet

GE has moved from 2 day to 20 minute builds. In this post from DevOps.com, the author highlights a presentation from DevOps Enterprise Summit where GE’s Alan Schachtely presented. He explains how GE has shifted the culture of 15,000 software engineers to a devops mindset with lean, agile principles.

The New Mobile-Cloud Enterprise

This article, published by TechCrunch, covers some of the recent acquisitions and product launches in the mobile backend as a service space, including the launch of Pivotal CF Mobile Services. As PaaS reaches to be “Linux of the Cloud,” enterprises need more mobile apps.

This Month in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Now Available: Cloud Foundry Foundation Bylaws, Governance, Membership

Together, Cloud Foundry Foundation members IBM, HP, EMC, SAP, Centurylink, VMware, Intel, ActiveState, Canonical, Docker and others have moved past the momentum stage and produced a Code of Conduct, Bylaws, Governance Policy, Membership Agreement, Intellectual Property Policy, and more.

General Availability of Pivotal CF 1.3

Just as October was arriving, we announced the general availability of Pivotal CF 1.3. In under a year, the engineering team has made four releases. In this release, enhancements included multiple availability zones, multiple networks, security groups, on-demand access to enterprise Hadoop, and more.

Cloud Foundry’s Container Technology: A Garden Overview

Pivotal Engineer, Glyn Normington, develops container technology for Cloud Foundry. In this post, he explains the Cloud Foundry container technology. The Garden architecture has a platform agnostic front end and a platform-specific backend based on Linux. Glyn covers namespaces, networking, and more.

Co-Founder of Piston Cloud, OpenStack Joins Pivotal to Focus on Cloud Foundry

This month, Pivotal announced a new Field CTO for Cloud Foundry. Joshua McKenty explains how OpenStack rose to dominate the market and outlines a vision for where Cloud Foundry is heading. After giving a brief history of his own journey to the cloud, McKenty also explains why he is excited.

How shrebo, the Sharing Economy Platform, Innovates with Cloud Foundry

In this post, we had the opportunity to do interview the CTO of shrebo, a company who has built SaaS APIs on the Cloud Foundry platform with Python/Django. The CTO, a 20 year veteran who has worked at IBM, SAS, and Credit Suisse, explains his needs, architecture, development benefits, and much more.

How to Continuously Deploy Code with Jenkins and Pivotal CF

After launching a partnership with Cloudbees in September, this blog post explains how the Jenkins Enterprise service is deployed via Pivotal CF Ops Manager. The process is very simple and streamlined—setting up master and slave, registration of trial license, and integration.

Service Management Through Cloud Foundry Eclipse

In this post, Pivotal Engineer, Nieraj Singh, explains the Cloud Foundry Eclipse plug-in, a joint collaboration between Pivotal and IBM. He explains how to install the plug-in, create a server instance with Pivotal Web Services, create service instances, and bind them to applications.

All Things Pivotal Podcast—Now Available

When Pivotal’s Simon Elisha started the AWS Podcast back in 2011, it became a regular part of the listening “diet” of thousands of people in over 100 countries to understand the radical changes in how IT was being consumed & delivered. Now, Simon’s dialogue is available again under the All Things Pivotal Podcast.

Upcoming PaaS Events 2014

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CloudFoundry

This Month in PaaS: Top Headlines for Platform as a Service

31 Ott , 2014  

This Month in PaaSOctober was a sprint in the Platform as a Service space—there was no sign of slowing down.

Not only has the next wave of companies proved the benefits of PaaS and the devops movement, there is a tremendous amount of Pivotal CF and Cloud Foundry technology news for containers like Docker, mobile back end services, microservices, Eclipse integration, and Jenkins CI as a service. In addition, this was the month that OpenStack’s co-founder joined Pivotal as Field CTO, Spring released Spring Cloud (with Cloud Foundry bits), and, in case you missed it, Pivotal CF 1.3 became generally available.

Here is Pivotal’s inaugural round-up of This Month in PaaS—16 stories to keep us all up to speed.

This Month in Platform as a Service 

The Economics of IaaS causes Application Demand and PaaS to Skyrocket

Efficiency and cost reduction on the part of IaaS is leading to an increase in application creation and consumption—this will drive PaaS adoption. The argument, made by CIO Magazine Advisor and ActiveState VP, Bernard Golden, summarizes what many others in the industry believe is happening.

Spring Cloud 1.0.0.M1 Available

Spring Cloud provides common patterns for distributed systems, covering configuration, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy, control bus, one-time tokens, and much more. This release helps Java developers become quickly productive on Cloud Foundry.

Ubuntu Release supports Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, and Docker

Upon joining the Cloud Foundry Advisory Board, Canonical sent a signal to the market. In its latest release, Ubuntu 14.10, capabilities support Metal as a Service (MaaS). This means any cluster of physical machines can be transformed into a scalable platform for Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, or Hadoop.

Cloud Foundry’s Evolution, Docker, and More: An Interview with Pivotal’s James Watters

CenturyLink Labs’ Lucas Carlson, sat down to interview Pivotal’s James Watters. In the conversation, they cover the long range and recent history of Cloud Foundry, microservices, Deigo, containers, Docker, ecosystem maturity, and more. Watters points out the fact that ISVs are saying they need to support it.

Microservices and PaaS—Part IV

Recently, members of the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board began a series on this topic, and began with the premise that a single war file and monolithic application is no way to deliver modern cloud services. This article explains how PaaS features simplify and support microservices development.

Are Docker Containers Essential to PaaS?

In this post from Information Week, pundit Charles Babcock, summarizes a panel he moderated on the topic at INTEROP. The PaaS panel covered Linux containers, and the four panelists gave their thoughts on the importance of Docker. Interestingly, they all backed the importance of these containers.

Shadow IT Risk and Reward

While shadow IT, as a concept, has been around a while. It is still one of the more important, strategic considerations for rolling your own PaaS. This article is one of the more thorough reviews of the behaviors driving the trend, and it captures relevant statistics as well as pitfalls and approaches.

GE’s Big Agile Bet

GE has moved from 2 day to 20 minute builds. In this post from DevOps.com, the author highlights a presentation from DevOps Enterprise Summit where GE’s Alan Schachtely presented. He explains how GE has shifted the culture of 15,000 software engineers to a devops mindset with lean, agile principles.

The New Mobile-Cloud Enterprise

This article, published by TechCrunch, covers some of the recent acquisitions and product launches in the mobile backend as a service space, including the launch of Pivotal CF Mobile Services. As PaaS reaches to be “Linux of the Cloud,” enterprises need more mobile apps.

This Month in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Now Available: Cloud Foundry Foundation Bylaws, Governance, Membership

Together, Cloud Foundry Foundation members IBM, HP, EMC, SAP, Centurylink, VMware, Intel, ActiveState, Canonical, Docker and others have moved past the momentum stage and produced a Code of Conduct, Bylaws, Governance Policy, Membership Agreement, Intellectual Property Policy, and more.

General Availability of Pivotal CF 1.3

Just as October was arriving, we announced the general availability of Pivotal CF 1.3. In under a year, the engineering team has made four releases. In this release, enhancements included multiple availability zones, multiple networks, security groups, on-demand access to enterprise Hadoop, and more.

Cloud Foundry’s Container Technology: A Garden Overview

Pivotal Engineer, Glyn Normington, develops container technology for Cloud Foundry. In this post, he explains the Cloud Foundry container technology. The Garden architecture has a platform agnostic front end and a platform-specific backend based on Linux. Glyn covers namespaces, networking, and more.

Co-Founder of Piston Cloud, OpenStack Joins Pivotal to Focus on Cloud Foundry

This month, Pivotal announced a new Field CTO for Cloud Foundry. Joshua McKenty explains how OpenStack rose to dominate the market and outlines a vision for where Cloud Foundry is heading. After giving a brief history of his own journey to the cloud, McKenty also explains why he is excited.

How shrebo, the Sharing Economy Platform, Innovates with Cloud Foundry

In this post, we had the opportunity to do interview the CTO of shrebo, a company who has built SaaS APIs on the Cloud Foundry platform with Python/Django. The CTO, a 20 year veteran who has worked at IBM, SAS, and Credit Suisse, explains his needs, architecture, development benefits, and much more.

How to Continuously Deploy Code with Jenkins and Pivotal CF

After launching a partnership with Cloudbees in September, this blog post explains how the Jenkins Enterprise service is deployed via Pivotal CF Ops Manager. The process is very simple and streamlined—setting up master and slave, registration of trial license, and integration.

Service Management Through Cloud Foundry Eclipse

In this post, Pivotal Engineer, Nieraj Singh, explains the Cloud Foundry Eclipse plug-in, a joint collaboration between Pivotal and IBM. He explains how to install the plug-in, create a server instance with Pivotal Web Services, create service instances, and bind them to applications.

All Things Pivotal Podcast—Now Available

When Pivotal’s Simon Elisha started the AWS Podcast back in 2011, it became a regular part of the listening “diet” of thousands of people in over 100 countries to understand the radical changes in how IT was being consumed & delivered. Now, Simon’s dialogue is available again under the All Things Pivotal Podcast.

Upcoming PaaS Events 2014

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CloudFoundry

This Month in PaaS: Top Headlines for Platform as a Service

31 Ott , 2014  

This Month in PaaSOctober was a sprint in the Platform as a Service space—there was no sign of slowing down.

Not only has the next wave of companies proved the benefits of PaaS and the devops movement, there is a tremendous amount of Pivotal CF and Cloud Foundry technology news for containers like Docker, mobile back end services, microservices, Eclipse integration, and Jenkins CI as a service. In addition, this was the month that OpenStack’s co-founder joined Pivotal as Field CTO, Spring released Spring Cloud (with Cloud Foundry bits), and, in case you missed it, Pivotal CF 1.3 became generally available.

Here is Pivotal’s inaugural round-up of This Month in PaaS—16 stories to keep us all up to speed.

This Month in Platform as a Service 

The Economics of IaaS causes Application Demand and PaaS to Skyrocket

Efficiency and cost reduction on the part of IaaS is leading to an increase in application creation and consumption—this will drive PaaS adoption. The argument, made by CIO Magazine Advisor and ActiveState VP, Bernard Golden, summarizes what many others in the industry believe is happening.

Spring Cloud 1.0.0.M1 Available

Spring Cloud provides common patterns for distributed systems, covering configuration, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy, control bus, one-time tokens, and much more. This release helps Java developers become quickly productive on Cloud Foundry.

Ubuntu Release supports Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, and Docker

Upon joining the Cloud Foundry Advisory Board, Canonical sent a signal to the market. In its latest release, Ubuntu 14.10, capabilities support Metal as a Service (MaaS). This means any cluster of physical machines can be transformed into a scalable platform for Cloud Foundry, OpenStack, or Hadoop.

Cloud Foundry’s Evolution, Docker, and More: An Interview with Pivotal’s James Watters

CenturyLink Labs’ Lucas Carlson, sat down to interview Pivotal’s James Watters. In the conversation, they cover the long range and recent history of Cloud Foundry, microservices, Deigo, containers, Docker, ecosystem maturity, and more. Watters points out the fact that ISVs are saying they need to support it.

Microservices and PaaS—Part IV

Recently, members of the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board began a series on this topic, and began with the premise that a single war file and monolithic application is no way to deliver modern cloud services. This article explains how PaaS features simplify and support microservices development.

Are Docker Containers Essential to PaaS?

In this post from Information Week, pundit Charles Babcock, summarizes a panel he moderated on the topic at INTEROP. The PaaS panel covered Linux containers, and the four panelists gave their thoughts on the importance of Docker. Interestingly, they all backed the importance of these containers.

Shadow IT Risk and Reward

While shadow IT, as a concept, has been around a while. It is still one of the more important, strategic considerations for rolling your own PaaS. This article is one of the more thorough reviews of the behaviors driving the trend, and it captures relevant statistics as well as pitfalls and approaches.

GE’s Big Agile Bet

GE has moved from 2 day to 20 minute builds. In this post from DevOps.com, the author highlights a presentation from DevOps Enterprise Summit where GE’s Alan Schachtely presented. He explains how GE has shifted the culture of 15,000 software engineers to a devops mindset with lean, agile principles.

The New Mobile-Cloud Enterprise

This article, published by TechCrunch, covers some of the recent acquisitions and product launches in the mobile backend as a service space, including the launch of Pivotal CF Mobile Services. As PaaS reaches to be “Linux of the Cloud,” enterprises need more mobile apps.

This Month in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Now Available: Cloud Foundry Foundation Bylaws, Governance, Membership

Together, Cloud Foundry Foundation members IBM, HP, EMC, SAP, Centurylink, VMware, Intel, ActiveState, Canonical, Docker and others have moved past the momentum stage and produced a Code of Conduct, Bylaws, Governance Policy, Membership Agreement, Intellectual Property Policy, and more.

General Availability of Pivotal CF 1.3

Just as October was arriving, we announced the general availability of Pivotal CF 1.3. In under a year, the engineering team has made four releases. In this release, enhancements included multiple availability zones, multiple networks, security groups, on-demand access to enterprise Hadoop, and more.

Cloud Foundry’s Container Technology: A Garden Overview

Pivotal Engineer, Glyn Normington, develops container technology for Cloud Foundry. In this post, he explains the Cloud Foundry container technology. The Garden architecture has a platform agnostic front end and a platform-specific backend based on Linux. Glyn covers namespaces, networking, and more.

Co-Founder of Piston Cloud, OpenStack Joins Pivotal to Focus on Cloud Foundry

This month, Pivotal announced a new Field CTO for Cloud Foundry. Joshua McKenty explains how OpenStack rose to dominate the market and outlines a vision for where Cloud Foundry is heading. After giving a brief history of his own journey to the cloud, McKenty also explains why he is excited.

How shrebo, the Sharing Economy Platform, Innovates with Cloud Foundry

In this post, we had the opportunity to do interview the CTO of shrebo, a company who has built SaaS APIs on the Cloud Foundry platform with Python/Django. The CTO, a 20 year veteran who has worked at IBM, SAS, and Credit Suisse, explains his needs, architecture, development benefits, and much more.

How to Continuously Deploy Code with Jenkins and Pivotal CF

After launching a partnership with Cloudbees in September, this blog post explains how the Jenkins Enterprise service is deployed via Pivotal CF Ops Manager. The process is very simple and streamlined—setting up master and slave, registration of trial license, and integration.

Service Management Through Cloud Foundry Eclipse

In this post, Pivotal Engineer, Nieraj Singh, explains the Cloud Foundry Eclipse plug-in, a joint collaboration between Pivotal and IBM. He explains how to install the plug-in, create a server instance with Pivotal Web Services, create service instances, and bind them to applications.

All Things Pivotal Podcast—Now Available

When Pivotal’s Simon Elisha started the AWS Podcast back in 2011, it became a regular part of the listening “diet” of thousands of people in over 100 countries to understand the radical changes in how IT was being consumed & delivered. Now, Simon’s dialogue is available again under the All Things Pivotal Podcast.

Upcoming PaaS Events 2014

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,