PaaS

PebbleNotes by Jigar Shah | New in the App Gallery

28 Nov , 2014  

Learn more about Jigar Shah and his app, PebbleNotes, created on OpenShift using JavaEE, GlassFish, MongoDB, Twitter Bootstrap, and jQuery.

Pebblenotes allows people to create daily notes, events, and tasks using a calendar and notepad. The notes can be organized daily or by tags. In short, it helps the user stay organized and remember important things.

The post PebbleNotes by Jigar Shah | New in the App Gallery appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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PaaS

Introducing a New Node-Based Hosting Subscription for OpenShift Online

16 Ott , 2014  

Today we’re excited to announce a new offering for enterprise OpenShift Online customers called Dedicated Node Services. This offering gives you the ability to run OpenShift gears in any region supported by AWS EC2 and connect your datacenter to OpenShift with VPC.

Node-based hosting also enables customers to isolate their nodes from other OpenShift Online nodes and users and also deploy customized gear sizes.

The post Introducing a New Node-Based Hosting Subscription for OpenShift Online appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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PaaS

Update rhc Tools Now and Avoid the Poodle SSL Issue

16 Ott , 2014  

On Tuesday, October 14, 2014, Google researchers released information about a new SSL vulnerability called Poodle (CVE-2014-3566). We have fixed this bug, but in the process noticed that some popular libraries were broken and require updating, such as slightly older versions of the rubygem httpclient. This library in particular is important because the OpenShift RHC […]

The post Update rhc Tools Now and Avoid the Poodle SSL Issue appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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PaaS

Web Fish Daily by Will Boyd | New in the App Gallery

3 Ott , 2014  

Welcome to the OpenShift Developer Spotlight where we get to know the members of the OpenShift community a little better and show off their skills as developers.
Interested in being featured? Apply here or view past entries.

 Will Boyd

  • Name: Will Boyd

Learn more about Web Fish Daily in our Application Gallery

What inspired you to be a developer?

Like a lot of developers, it was an intrinsic desire to build. There’s an immense feeling of satisfaction that comes from putting the pieces together, solving problems, and making something come alive.

Why did you choose OpenShift as your hosting platform?

I wanted to try something different, and saw good things about OpenShift, so I gave it a shot.

What advantages does OpenShift give you that other hosting platforms don’t?

Instantaneous flexibility. Also, the command line tools and the deployment process I was able to setup are great.

Tell us more about your application currently hosted on OpenShift:
  • Name: Web Fish Daily
  • What does it do? Web Fish Daily is a selection of web development links, updated daily, to help web developers stay informed.
  • What technologies were used to create your app? Node.js, MongoDB, KeystoneJS, Mongoose, Handlebars, Sass, Gulp
  • What motivated you to create this application and what problems does it solve? I wanted to keep up-to-date with front-end development and help others do the same. Creating a friendly site to share relevant knowledge on a daily basis seemed like a good way to accomplish this.

The post Web Fish Daily by Will Boyd | New in the App Gallery appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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PaaS

Web Fish Daily by Will Boyd | New in the App Gallery

3 Ott , 2014  

Welcome to the OpenShift Developer Spotlight where we get to know the members of the OpenShift community a little better and show off their skills as developers.
Interested in being featured? Apply here or view past entries.

 Will Boyd

  • Name: Will Boyd

Learn more about Web Fish Daily in our Application Gallery

What inspired you to be a developer?

Like a lot of developers, it was an intrinsic desire to build. There’s an immense feeling of satisfaction that comes from putting the pieces together, solving problems, and making something come alive.

Why did you choose OpenShift as your hosting platform?

I wanted to try something different, and saw good things about OpenShift, so I gave it a shot.

What advantages does OpenShift give you that other hosting platforms don’t?

Instantaneous flexibility. Also, the command line tools and the deployment process I was able to setup are great.

Tell us more about your application currently hosted on OpenShift:
  • Name: Web Fish Daily
  • What does it do? Web Fish Daily is a selection of web development links, updated daily, to help web developers stay informed.
  • What technologies were used to create your app? Node.js, MongoDB, KeystoneJS, Mongoose, Handlebars, Sass, Gulp
  • What motivated you to create this application and what problems does it solve? I wanted to keep up-to-date with front-end development and help others do the same. Creating a friendly site to share relevant knowledge on a daily basis seemed like a good way to accomplish this.

The post Web Fish Daily by Will Boyd | New in the App Gallery appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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Openshift

RHC Makes it Easy to Choose Where Your OpenShift App Runs

29 Set , 2014  

Last we we announced the general availability of European Hosting for OpenShift Online premium plan members. Now Bronze and Silver plan users can choose where their applications are hosted in the world. With over 2 million applications created by users around the world we heard repeatedly that this ability was needed.

How to Create a New Application in a Specific Region

As part of the regular application creation process (from the web console or command line tools) you decide where your application should be created.

Here’s an example from the CLI:

$ rhc create-app   --gear-size  --region  --scaling

To see a list of available regions for the plan you are on:

$ rhc region list

How to Migrate Your App to a Different Region

Users with existing applications can easily migrate their application between regions using the command line tools.

To see the region your application is currently being hosted in, use the following command:

$ rhc app show --gears -a 

And to migrate your application to a new region:

$ rhc app create New_Name --from-app App_Name --region     

If it’s important to you to maintain the same application name you can also use rhc snapshot as outlined in the KB article.

Visit the Developer Portal for In-depth rhc Usage

The OpenShift recently team created a whole new website to make Developers successful on OpenShift. We also added a special section explaining how to manage and create applications in different regions.

Receive Future Platform Announcements

Stay informed and learn more about OpenShift by receiving email updates.

Get updates by email

Openshift

Bash is Up to Date on OpenShift Online

25 Set , 2014  

Yesterday and today have been busy days for lots of system administrators who have been scrambling to patch their systems with updated bash packages. After the disclosure of a bash bug in CVE-2014-6271, nobody wanted their systems compromised by one of the many exploits this bug made possible.

Not everyone is in a panic; users of OpenShift Online have nothing to worry about. They know that the OpenShift Online team works with the Red Hat Product Security team to ensure that our platform remains secure. See the Security Team’s in-depth evaluation of the issue here.

Let me tell you about two of the platforms where I have applications running. The first is an OpenShift Online gear that runs my application in the cloud. The second is an old server I have that runs a traditional Linux distro. Yesterday, when people started getting wind of the advisory, my OpenShift application was already safe. The OpenShift Online team finished rolling out the update to production servers a few minutes before the advisory was published.

The new bash package had gone through the RHEL QA process, was signed and added to repositories, and had been tested by the OpenShift Online team on the OpenShift Online staging systems. Since I knew about the vulnerability, I was anxious to get my other systems patched, including the system running that old distro. I checked the vendor’s tracking page several times throughout the day, but each time I checked, there were updates available for some versions of the distro, but not for mine.

Finally, I decided to take matters into my own hands, and so I took a 40-minute afternoon break from work to download the bash source package, then to remind myself how to add a patch to the package build, and finally to rebuild and install the updated package. Of course, moments after I had my home-brew package installed, the fix was published by the vendor too, but that’s just Murphy’s law manifesting itself, right?

Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t a knock on another Linux distro. I wasn’t running a production version and I shouldn’t have been surprised when my version was the last to get updates. And it could have been much worse. $ sudo cp /bin/bash /bin/bash.old anyone?

Fast forward to today. This time, we had no warning when CVE-2014-7169 was published. Even so, the OpenShift Online team was ready and had a patched bash package from the RHEL and Product Security teams installed and tested on all OpenShift Online systems very soon after the patch became available.

I’m glad to know that my application that runs on OpenShift Online is secure, but I’ll have to ask you to excuse me. I’ve got an old Linux box to patch!

You can read more about the bug in bash and the patches that fix it here: https://access.redhat.com/articles/1200223

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PaaS

Host Your Own Rubygems Server for Free in 4 Easy Steps

25 Set , 2014  

Ruby

Sometimes you don’t want to share all your gems in a public place like RubyGems.org. If you are in this situation, I have a simple solution that will allow you to host your own gems using OpenShift. Geminabox is a project that provides a private RubyGems host as an open-source application. In this blog post, I will show how to install and use Geminabox on OpenShift.

And it’s super-easy!

Deploy the Ruby host

The whole deployment can be done in one simple step

rhc app create rubygems ruby-2.0 --from-code=https://github.com/openshift-quickstart/rubygems-quickstart.git

With this single command we ask OpenShift to create a new gear pre-configured for Ruby 2.0 and fetch the application from a Github repository, and put it into the newly created gear. OpenShift also starts the application for you, so the only thing you need to do is to navigate your browser to:

https://rubygems-.rhcloud.com/

The domain is user dependent and you’ll need to change it for the one you chose for your account.

If you don’t need a secured instance, you are done with the server part.

Securing the Rubygems Installation

As you are deploying a private RubyGems host, you probably want some privacy for your code. And yes, that’s also possible. To do that you need to change the code a bit.

Start by cloning the application code to your local machine and then enter the directory:

rhc git-clone rubygems
cd rubygems

now edit the config.ru file … uncomment these three commented lines:

use Rack::Auth::Basic, "RubyGems" do |username, password|
  username == 'rubygems' && password == 'password'
end

Finally change the username and password to something more secure and save the file.

The last thing you need to do is commit the code to your git repository and push it to OpenShift

git add .
git commit -m "Make it more secure"
git push origin master

and bam … your RubyGems host now requires valid credentials.

How to use

Once you have your own RubyGems host deployed, you can start using it. How you use it depends mostly on the tools you prefer. You probably use Bundler to manage the gems for your project. If you do, the only change you need to do is to replace the “source” in the Gemfile.

source 'https://rubygems-.rhcloud.com/'
 
gem 'x'
gem 'y'
...

Again, substitute the domain name to reflect for your own. You can completely remove the mention of RubyGems.org since your new RubyGems host acts as a mirror for it.

If you secured your installation you’ll need to specify the username and password:

source 'https://rubygems:password@rubygems-.rhcloud.com/'

Now your project should use your newly deployed RubyGems host as the gem repository.

Deploying your own gems

To deploy your gems to your new RubyGems host, simply upload the gem file using the web interface. This works without installing any tools locally.

If you want to deploy the gems from the command line, you need to install the “geminabox” gem

gem install geminabox

Then use it to push the gem file to the server:

gem inabox  -g "https://rubygems-.rhcloud.com/"

Replace the domain with your own (and use username and password to authenticate, if you have enabled it).

Conclusion

Now you can host your own gems in your own private repository on OpenShift. OpenShift allows you to deploy this application for free so why not try it out?

Next Steps

The post Host Your Own Rubygems Server for Free in 4 Easy Steps appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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Openshift

Announcing European Hosting for OpenShift Online

24 Set , 2014  

OpenShift Online European Hosting

OpenShift Online has been used by developers around the world to create over 2 million applications. Today, we’re taking another step to support our growing global customer base by adding a new hosting offering in Ireland for OpenShift Online. Developers can now run their applications with the same functionality from either of our US or European hosting locations.

OpenShift Online European Hosting

Lower Latency for Production Applications

Maximize application performance by hosting your app closer to end-users. Our initial testing showed significantly reduced latency of over 100ms for European end-users accessing applications hosted in Europe versus the applications hosted in US.

Production Gears, Marketplace, and More

All production gear sizes are available immediately for deployment in the Europe hosting region. All Marketplace add-ons work seamlessly in both regions as well.

Updated Client Tools (RHC)

The RHC client tools have been updated allowing you to easily create or migrate applications to a specific region. Check out our Developer Portal for a complete look at region and zone management.

Your Input Matters

Multi-region availabililty was ranked #2 by our users on the list of most-wanted features. If you have more feedback about multi-region availability or ideas to make your OpenShift user experience better we want to hear from you at openshift.uservoice.com.

Stay informed and learn more about OpenShift by receiving email updates.

Get updates by email

PaaS

DevOps and OpenShift | A Perfect Match

23 Set , 2014  

If you ask three people what they think DevOps is, you’ll get three answers: “a way of running an IT department”, “a culture”, “something to do with Phoenix”. Ask a fourth person and you might hear “You can use OpenShift for that”.

To see what DevOps has to do with the world’s favourite PaaS, I went along to the “OpenShift By Red Hat: The PaaS for DevOps” technical deep dive in Brisbane that was given as part of a road show in Australia and New Zealand in July and August 2014.

The session was held at Brisbane’s Treasury Hotel, an early 19th century building with an Edwardian-Baroque exterior and the type of pre-air conditioning climate control features that play havoc on wireless signals (thick walls). There were about 50 people there, with an approximate average age somewhere between late 30s and 40s. About 8 in the crowd were Red Hatters in support our very own Katie Miller, who literally wrote the book on OpenShift. Of those 50ish people, five were in DevOps environments and an additional five were experienced with PaaS.

Using DevOps as a “filter for accessing usefulness of PaaS” was Change Architect Stefano Picozzi, the main presenter of the session. From the beginning, he made it clear he wouldn’t make the case for DevOps, that it would be a given. He also described OpenShift in a way I hadn’t heard before, as the “voice of the customer, telling Red Hat what to do”. The OpenShift Online offering makes that uniquely true for OpenShift, as feedback from the mass market version quickly makes its way into the Enterprise version running behind corporate firewalls. Stefano also suggested what the technologist inside of all of us hopes is true; that access the right tech and tools can encourage good decisions, practice, and process.

For those who haven’t been following the ongoing DevOps revolution, or had The Phoenix Project thrown at them, DevOps is a way of resolving the classic tension between developers and system administrators: fast versus predictable. The extent to which a PaaS supports a DevOps team can be measured by the extent to which it increases the velocity of software releases, improves the quality of each release, and reduces waste. As the DevOps army are quick to point out, DevOps is about culture: the DevOps PaaS should also support teaming, regular feedback, and experimentation.

Stefano introduced the work of B.F. Skinner to address OpenShift’s potential cultural impact, in particular the idea that behavior is a result of the feedback loop between antecedent and consequence. To an operator the consequence of deploying software as an OpenShift gear is consistency in managing gears, which is the same regardless regardless of what the gear contains. The consequence of OpenShift on developers is a (potentially) self service development environment that lets you choose the way you work, with IDE integrations, a CLI, a web interface, and stable REST APIs. Developing on OpenShift means six steps to get from app to done: idea, budget, code, test, launch, scale (and the OpenShift handles the scaling part for you by including HA Proxy and integrating with existing load balancers).

Katie Miller then showed the audience how easy it is to get an app running, using one command to set up DNS, a Git repository, ssh access to the Gear set up, and a local clone of the gear’s Git repository. If you’ve seen it before, you might have forgotten how impressive it is to watch that happen, or to see how easy it is to relate to what’s inside the gear. Same goes for watching the app scale in real time.

Stefano followed Katie’s demo Insulter app (insults you in Shakespearean fashion) with some real life examples. Cisco has seen benefits from using OpenShift as their environment for developing lightweight mobile apps, like the ability to use existing yum update infrastructure, to use OpenShift REST APIs to integrate with their existing development infrastructure, and the density of apps they can deploy on a small number of nodes (242 to date). Stefano mentioned one company where the TCO for PaaS versus more traditional deployment scenarios became cheaper when they reached 6 apps.

Project Atomic and Docker showed up toward the end of the session when talking about the future of OpenShift, in the context of pushing more functionality out of OpenShift itself into the operating system so that the OpenShift developers can focus on delivering value at the top of the stack in the form of a better user (developer / operator) experience. Coming soon is the ability to consume more of Red Hat’s middleware projects (BRMS, etc), niche 3rd party capabilities (SAP, Hortonworks, and .NET support thanks to a company called Uhuru (the Swahili word for freedom, also the name of a pan-African movement).

If innovation is creativity at commercial scale, and DevOps is a path to business agility, then OpenShift is especially compelling if it can help address the behavioral anti-patterns that impede DevOps. Stefano and Katie made a compelling case for “OpenShift By Red Hat: The PaaS for DevOps” that seemed to resonate well with the audience in Brisbane, and got me excited about the possibilities OpenShift could open up.

The post DevOps and OpenShift | A Perfect Match appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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