APIs

Google App Engine Adds .NET Support As It Races to Be The PaaS of Choice

14 Mar , 2017  

Python? Check. Ruby? Check. Java? No problem. Node.js? Got it. PHP? Roger that. ASP.NET Core? No sweat.  Wait? ASP.NET too? 

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CloudFoundry

Build Newsletter: Open Source, PaaS, Big Data for Developers – February 2015

13 Feb , 2015  

featured-buildIn this month’s Build Newsletter, the state of the open source, big data and PaaS markets continue to be the main threads throughout the industry news.

Open Source

First, we love this report on the Linux Foundation’s assessment of how open source projects such as OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Docker are driving both innovation and enterprise readiness in cloud technology.Apache Hadoop® is another excellent example of how wide adoption of projects dramatically shifts the market, as we see in this article on Deutsche Bank’s latest Hadoop study (big data OSS). OSS has both become a wonderful way for companies to collaborate on technology and also create high growth business such as the record breaking business performance with Pivotal Cloud Foundry.  Two other related and noteworthy items include independent analyst Steve Chambers’ highlights on Cloud Foundry’s impressive first year, retracting a previous “bearish” attitude, and Matt Asay’s analysis asking if Cloud Foundry will be the next Red Hat.In our own experience, we have seen customers shift their buying, preferring OSS-based solutions as much as possible. Tesora’s shift to OSS within the OpenStack ecosystem is a great example of this.Individual contributors are the lifeblood of OSS, but you don’t have to be a developer checking in code to contribute.  Here are 8 ways you can contribute to open source projects without writing code.Sometimes, OSS projects may seem to run in their own silos or ecosystem niches.  Part of the power of OSS comes when contributors help increase the “innovation surface area” by bridging and connecting technologies. Several excellent examples can be seen here in multiple Spring and CF projects bridging PaaS, cloud, Apache Hadoop®, and MySQL:

Finally, in an effort to better align investment with the primary challenges Pivotal is trying to solve, Pivotal is looking for new sponsors for Groovy and Grails.

Custom Development and PaaS

First up is an interesting analysis by Redmonk, suggesting the most popular programming languages in use today. The top 5 all run on Cloud Foundry—JavaScript (e.g. Node.js), Java, PHP, Python, and Ruby (tied for 5th).On to platform decisions—there is always the ongoing debate whether to build or buy a development platform. Here is an explanation on how you might choose what works for you. Either way, development platforms are undergoing significant change with the rise of Docker and PaaS ecosystems such as Cloud Foundry, and this is having a profound effect on traditional IT operations and processes.More technical descriptions of PaaS can be found in this slideshow of The Cloud Foundry Story from @DevOpsSummit and this deeper dive on Why Services are Essential to Your Platform as a Service.Finally, a “How To” on  12-Factor App-Style Backing Services and a narrative on old versus new app deployment methods (with microservices in a PaaS) are two examples of techniques that today’s developers use with PaaS.Pivotal-Blog-CTA-NewBigData

Big Data and Data Science for Developers

First, Gigaom suggests all developers need to become familiar with big data technologies and use cases since soon every business application will likely incorporate some big data functionality.For example, big data is making its way into digital travel services—Expedia plans to “double the size” of their Apache Hadoop® cluster in 2015 to help solve its big data challenges in the UK, having previously only used DB2 and Microsoft SQL databases.Not convinced yet? Here is SaaS visionary Mark Benioff and two separate executive research surveys saying big data and predictive analytics are top priorities and that CEOs desire big data solutions: 1)  PwC CEO Survey Recap: Mobile, Data Mining, and Analysis most important 2) IDG Enterprise Big Data Research. Expect funding for future projects and all the market requirements you are building towards to reflect such priorities.Cloud Foundry is useful for big data and analytical applications as this blog about Cloud Foundry for Data Scientists reveals, and in how Pivotal built a Super Bowl social sentiment analysis application in less than a day on Cloud Foundry using microservices.Editor’s Note: Apache, Apache Hadoop, Hadoop, and the yellow elephant logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Apache Software Foundation in the United States and/or other countries.

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CloudFoundry

Build Newsletter: Open Source, PaaS, Big Data for Developers – February 2015

13 Feb , 2015  

featured-buildIn this month’s Build Newsletter, the state of the open source, big data and PaaS markets continue to be the main threads throughout the industry news.

Open Source

First, we love this report on the Linux Foundation’s assessment of how open source projects such as OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Docker are driving both innovation and enterprise readiness in cloud technology.Apache Hadoop® is another excellent example of how wide adoption of projects dramatically shifts the market, as we see in this article on Deutsche Bank’s latest Hadoop study (big data OSS). OSS has both become a wonderful way for companies to collaborate on technology and also create high growth business such as the record breaking business performance with Pivotal Cloud Foundry.  Two other related and noteworthy items include independent analyst Steve Chambers’ highlights on Cloud Foundry’s impressive first year, retracting a previous “bearish” attitude, and Matt Asay’s analysis asking if Cloud Foundry will be the next Red Hat.In our own experience, we have seen customers shift their buying, preferring OSS-based solutions as much as possible. Tesora’s shift to OSS within the OpenStack ecosystem is a great example of this.Individual contributors are the lifeblood of OSS, but you don’t have to be a developer checking in code to contribute.  Here are 8 ways you can contribute to open source projects without writing code.Sometimes, OSS projects may seem to run in their own silos or ecosystem niches.  Part of the power of OSS comes when contributors help increase the “innovation surface area” by bridging and connecting technologies. Several excellent examples can be seen here in multiple Spring and CF projects bridging PaaS, cloud, Apache Hadoop®, and MySQL:

Finally, in an effort to better align investment with the primary challenges Pivotal is trying to solve, Pivotal is looking for new sponsors for Groovy and Grails.

Custom Development and PaaS

First up is an interesting analysis by Redmonk, suggesting the most popular programming languages in use today. The top 5 all run on Cloud Foundry—JavaScript (e.g. Node.js), Java, PHP, Python, and Ruby (tied for 5th).On to platform decisions—there is always the ongoing debate whether to build or buy a development platform. Here is an explanation on how you might choose what works for you. Either way, development platforms are undergoing significant change with the rise of Docker and PaaS ecosystems such as Cloud Foundry, and this is having a profound effect on traditional IT operations and processes.More technical descriptions of PaaS can be found in this slideshow of The Cloud Foundry Story from @DevOpsSummit and this deeper dive on Why Services are Essential to Your Platform as a Service.Finally, a “How To” on  12-Factor App-Style Backing Services and a narrative on old versus new app deployment methods (with microservices in a PaaS) are two examples of techniques that today’s developers use with PaaS.Pivotal-Blog-CTA-NewBigData

Big Data and Data Science for Developers

First, Gigaom suggests all developers need to become familiar with big data technologies and use cases since soon every business application will likely incorporate some big data functionality.For example, big data is making its way into digital travel services—Expedia plans to “double the size” of their Apache Hadoop® cluster in 2015 to help solve its big data challenges in the UK, having previously only used DB2 and Microsoft SQL databases.Not convinced yet? Here is SaaS visionary Mark Benioff and two separate executive research surveys saying big data and predictive analytics are top priorities and that CEOs desire big data solutions: 1)  PwC CEO Survey Recap: Mobile, Data Mining, and Analysis most important 2) IDG Enterprise Big Data Research. Expect funding for future projects and all the market requirements you are building towards to reflect such priorities.Cloud Foundry is useful for big data and analytical applications as this blog about Cloud Foundry for Data Scientists reveals, and in how Pivotal built a Super Bowl social sentiment analysis application in less than a day on Cloud Foundry using microservices.Editor’s Note: Apache, Apache Hadoop, Hadoop, and the yellow elephant logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Apache Software Foundation in the United States and/or other countries.

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CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

PLAY EPISODE #15

 

RESOURCES:

Transcript

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the All Things Pivotal podcast, the podcast at the intersection of agile, cloud, and big data. Stay tuned for regular updates, technical deep dives, architecture discussions, and interviews. Please share your feedback with us by e-mailing podcast@pivotal.io.

Simon Elisha:

Hello everyone and welcome back to the All Things Pivotal podcast. Fantastic to have you back. My name is Simon Elisha. Good to have you with me again today. A quick and punchy podcast this week, but an interesting one nonetheless hopefully and answering a question that comes up quite commonly. Well, it’s really 2 questions. The first question is, how can I try out Pivotal Cloud Foundry really, really quickly without any set up time? Which often relates to my answer being, ‘Well have you heard of Pivotal Web Services?’ To which people say, ‘What is Pivotal Web Services?’ Also known as, PWS. Also known as P-Dubs.

Pivotal Web Services is a service available on the Web, funnily enough, at run.pivotal.io. It is a hosted version of Pivotal Cloud Foundry running on Amazon Web Services in the US. It provides a platform upon which you can use as a developer, push applications to it, organize your workspaces, and really use as a development platform or even as a production location for your applications. It is a fully-featured running version of Pivotal CF in the Cloud. Not surprisingly, that’s what Pivotal CF can do, but this provides a hosted version for you.

Let’s unpack this a little bit and have a look at what it is and why you might want to use it. The first thing that’s good to know is you can connect to run.pivotal.io straight away. You don’t need a credit card to start and you get a 60-day free trial. I’ll talk about what you get in that 60-day free trial shortly, but the good thing to know is you can go and try it straight away. Often when I’m talking to customers and they’re getting their toe in the water with platforms and service and they’re trying to understand what it is and they say, ‘Oh where can I just try and push an app or test something out?’ I say, ‘Hey go to Pivotal Web Services, it’s free, you can try it out, you can grab an application you’ve got on the shelf and just see what it’s like.’ They go, ‘Well that’s pretty cool, I can do it straight away.’ No friction in that happening.

In terms of what you can use on the platform, so we currently support apps written in Java, Grails, Play, Spring, Node.js, Ruby on Rails, Sinatra, Go, Python, or PHP. Any of those ones will automatically be discovered and [hey presto 02:37] CF push and away we go. If you’ve been listening to previous episodes you’ll know the magic of the CF push process. If however you need another language, you can use a Community Buildpack or you can even write a custom one yourself that will run on the platform as well. Obviously, if you’re running an application you may want to consume some services. You can choose from a variety of third party data bases, e-mail services, monitoring services, that exist in the Marketplace, that exist on Pivotal Cloud Foundry. I’ll run you through what some of those services are because there really is a nice selection available for you.

What you then do is you buy into those services within your application and Pivotal Cloud Foundry, and P-Dubs in particular, takes care of all the connection criteria or the buying in process or the credentials etc, which make it nice and easy. You may be saying, ‘Well hmm, what does this cost me to get access to this kind of platform?’ Well, it’s a really simple, simple model. It’s application centric and you pay 3 cents US per gig per hour. That’s the per hour cost is for the amount of memory used by the application to run. Now, with that 3 cents you get included your routing, so your traffic routing, your load balancing, you can up to 1 gig of ephemeral disk space on your app instances. You get free storage for your application files when they get pushed to the platform. You don’t pay for that storage cost at all. You get bandwidth both in and out, up to 2 terabytes of bandwidth. You get unified log streaming, which we’ll talk about and health management, which we’ll also talk about.

As you can imagine, this could be very cost-effective platform for dev test and production workloads because you’re only paying for what you use when you use it and you’re only paying at the application layer on a per memory basis. Now, there’s a really handy pricing tab on the Pivotal Web Services page that lets you put in how many app instances you’d need for your application and will punch out for you that cost on a per month basis for the hosting, which is really, really nice.

What are some of the things that we allow you to do with this platform? What are some of the benefits? As I mentioned, you get the 60-day free trial and the 60-day free trial, you get 2 gig of application memory, so it can run applications that consume up to 2 gig of aggregate memory. It can have up to 10 application services from the free tier of the Marketplace. This means you get to play with quite a lot of capability at very low cost, very, very easily.

Aside from pushing your app, which is yeah, nice and easy and something you want to do, what else do we do with this? Well, we can [elect 05:17] to have performance monitoring. In the developer console, which you can log into, you can see all your spaces, your applications and their status, how many services are bound to them etc. You can drill into them in more detail to see what they’re actually consuming. If you want even more detailed monitoring, so inside the application type monitoring, you can use New Relic for that and that’s a service that’s offered in the Marketplace. It has a zero touch configuration. For Java applications, you can basically [crank and bind 05:47] you New Relic service to your app very, very simply with basically no configuration. It’s amazing. For other languages like Ruby or Java Script, you have to the New Relic [agent 05:56] running, but it’s still a pretty trivial process to get it up and going.

Now, once your application is running, you probably want to make sure it keeps running. A normal desire to have. We have this thing called, The Health Manager. This is an automated system that monitors your application for you and if your application instances exit you to an error or something happens where the number of instances is less than the ones that you actually created when you did your CF push or CF Scale, the platform will automatically recover those particular instances for you. Obviously, the log will be updated to indicate that that took place. If you set up an application and you have 3 instances running, it will run them for you. If one of them fails, it will spin up another one for you and you’re good to go.

Another capability is, of course, the Unified Log Streaming. One of the features of Pivotal CF is the ability to bring logs together from multiple application instances into the one place. In PWS, we do the same thing. We have this streaming log API that will send all the information, all the components, for your application to the one location. You can tailor this interactively yourself or you can use a syslog drain too, once you have a third party tool you may like. Tools like, Splunk or Logstash etc. They’re all scoped by a unique application ID and an instance index, so they can correlate across multiple events and see how they all fit together, which is nice.

The system also has a really nice Web console, which is built for really agile developers to use. You jump in, you can see what applications are running, where, who started them, what’s going on. You can even connect your spacers with your CI pipeline to make sure that builds are going into the correct life cycle stage of being deployed appropriately as well. You can also see quotas and building across your spacers because you have access to organizations and spacers as well. We’ll talk about organizations and spacers in another episode.

What about from a services perspective? What are some of the services that we have available in the Marketplace? Well, it’s growing all the time. It’s a movable face, as I like to say. We have a number. I’ll just call out a few highlight ones. Things like, Searchify for search, BlazeMeter for load testing, Redis Cloud, which is an enterprise-class cache. We talked about caches a little while ago, ClearDB, which is a MySQL database service. We have Searchly, ElasticSearch. We have the Memcached [D 08:19] Cloud. We have SendGrid for sending e-mail, MongoLab for MongoDB as a service, New Relic obviously for access to performance criteria. RabbitMQ, so through Cloud AMQP, ElephantSQL, PostgreSQL as a service etc, etc. A good selection of services there are available to you to use.

It’s interesting seeing what people use this for. Often, customers who use this for a dev and test experience or to get the developers up to speed with using platform as a service. A company called [Synapse, which I’ll say 08:49], which is small, or young I should say, Boston based company that builds software and service web and mobile apps for consumer startups, they decided to use Pivotal Web Services for their platform because they wanted to just have the same develop experience through dev test and production, and it completely suited their needs. It gave them the flexibility in terms of how they built the application, it gave them the sizing requirements they needed etc. The other nice thing that they got out of it was the ability to deploy their particular application both in the public Cloud or in private Clouds that customers wanted to run. What they realized is that if they had customers who said, ‘Hey we really like your particular application, we like your service, but we want to run it in-house for whatever reason that we have,’ they had a very simple and easy way to say that ‘Hey, you just run Pivotal CF internally, we bring our code across, and it will work fine.’ A really interesting example there.

If you’ve ever wanted to have a play with Pivotal CF, you wondered how it looks, and what the experience is from a developer perspective, then Pivotal Web Services or PWS is the place to go. That’s run.pivotal.io. There’s a 60-day free trial. You don’t have to enter your credit card when you sign up for the free trial. You can have a bit of an experiment and see how you go. Hopefully you’ll be able to make something pretty cool and until then, talk to you later, and keep on building.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the All Things Pivotal podcast. If you enjoyed it, please share it with others. We love hearing your feedback, so please send any comments or suggestions to podcast@pivotal.io.

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CloudFoundry

All Things Pivotal Podcast Episode #15: What is Pivotal Web Services?

10 Feb , 2015  

featured-pivotal-podcastYou have a great idea for an app—and need a quick and easy place to deploy it.

You are interested in Platform as a Service—but you want a low risk and free way to try it out.

You are constrained on dev/test capacity and need somewhere your developers can work effectively and quickly—NOW.

Whilst you might be familiar with Pivotal CF as a Platform as a Service that you can deploy on-premises or in the cloud provider of your choice—you may not know that Pivotal CF is also available in a hosted for as Pivotal Web Services.

In this episode we take a closer look at Pivotal Web Services—what is it used for, and how you can take advantage of it.

PLAY EPISODE #15

 

RESOURCES:

Transcript

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the All Things Pivotal podcast, the podcast at the intersection of agile, cloud, and big data. Stay tuned for regular updates, technical deep dives, architecture discussions, and interviews. Please share your feedback with us by e-mailing podcast@pivotal.io.

Simon Elisha:

Hello everyone and welcome back to the All Things Pivotal podcast. Fantastic to have you back. My name is Simon Elisha. Good to have you with me again today. A quick and punchy podcast this week, but an interesting one nonetheless hopefully and answering a question that comes up quite commonly. Well, it’s really 2 questions. The first question is, how can I try out Pivotal Cloud Foundry really, really quickly without any set up time? Which often relates to my answer being, ‘Well have you heard of Pivotal Web Services?’ To which people say, ‘What is Pivotal Web Services?’ Also known as, PWS. Also known as P-Dubs.

Pivotal Web Services is a service available on the Web, funnily enough, at run.pivotal.io. It is a hosted version of Pivotal Cloud Foundry running on Amazon Web Services in the US. It provides a platform upon which you can use as a developer, push applications to it, organize your workspaces, and really use as a development platform or even as a production location for your applications. It is a fully-featured running version of Pivotal CF in the Cloud. Not surprisingly, that’s what Pivotal CF can do, but this provides a hosted version for you.

Let’s unpack this a little bit and have a look at what it is and why you might want to use it. The first thing that’s good to know is you can connect to run.pivotal.io straight away. You don’t need a credit card to start and you get a 60-day free trial. I’ll talk about what you get in that 60-day free trial shortly, but the good thing to know is you can go and try it straight away. Often when I’m talking to customers and they’re getting their toe in the water with platforms and service and they’re trying to understand what it is and they say, ‘Oh where can I just try and push an app or test something out?’ I say, ‘Hey go to Pivotal Web Services, it’s free, you can try it out, you can grab an application you’ve got on the shelf and just see what it’s like.’ They go, ‘Well that’s pretty cool, I can do it straight away.’ No friction in that happening.

In terms of what you can use on the platform, so we currently support apps written in Java, Grails, Play, Spring, Node.js, Ruby on Rails, Sinatra, Go, Python, or PHP. Any of those ones will automatically be discovered and [hey presto 02:37] CF push and away we go. If you’ve been listening to previous episodes you’ll know the magic of the CF push process. If however you need another language, you can use a Community Buildpack or you can even write a custom one yourself that will run on the platform as well. Obviously, if you’re running an application you may want to consume some services. You can choose from a variety of third party data bases, e-mail services, monitoring services, that exist in the Marketplace, that exist on Pivotal Cloud Foundry. I’ll run you through what some of those services are because there really is a nice selection available for you.

What you then do is you buy into those services within your application and Pivotal Cloud Foundry, and P-Dubs in particular, takes care of all the connection criteria or the buying in process or the credentials etc, which make it nice and easy. You may be saying, ‘Well hmm, what does this cost me to get access to this kind of platform?’ Well, it’s a really simple, simple model. It’s application centric and you pay 3 cents US per gig per hour. That’s the per hour cost is for the amount of memory used by the application to run. Now, with that 3 cents you get included your routing, so your traffic routing, your load balancing, you can up to 1 gig of ephemeral disk space on your app instances. You get free storage for your application files when they get pushed to the platform. You don’t pay for that storage cost at all. You get bandwidth both in and out, up to 2 terabytes of bandwidth. You get unified log streaming, which we’ll talk about and health management, which we’ll also talk about.

As you can imagine, this could be very cost-effective platform for dev test and production workloads because you’re only paying for what you use when you use it and you’re only paying at the application layer on a per memory basis. Now, there’s a really handy pricing tab on the Pivotal Web Services page that lets you put in how many app instances you’d need for your application and will punch out for you that cost on a per month basis for the hosting, which is really, really nice.

What are some of the things that we allow you to do with this platform? What are some of the benefits? As I mentioned, you get the 60-day free trial and the 60-day free trial, you get 2 gig of application memory, so it can run applications that consume up to 2 gig of aggregate memory. It can have up to 10 application services from the free tier of the Marketplace. This means you get to play with quite a lot of capability at very low cost, very, very easily.

Aside from pushing your app, which is yeah, nice and easy and something you want to do, what else do we do with this? Well, we can [elect 05:17] to have performance monitoring. In the developer console, which you can log into, you can see all your spaces, your applications and their status, how many services are bound to them etc. You can drill into them in more detail to see what they’re actually consuming. If you want even more detailed monitoring, so inside the application type monitoring, you can use New Relic for that and that’s a service that’s offered in the Marketplace. It has a zero touch configuration. For Java applications, you can basically [crank and bind 05:47] you New Relic service to your app very, very simply with basically no configuration. It’s amazing. For other languages like Ruby or Java Script, you have to the New Relic [agent 05:56] running, but it’s still a pretty trivial process to get it up and going.

Now, once your application is running, you probably want to make sure it keeps running. A normal desire to have. We have this thing called, The Health Manager. This is an automated system that monitors your application for you and if your application instances exit you to an error or something happens where the number of instances is less than the ones that you actually created when you did your CF push or CF Scale, the platform will automatically recover those particular instances for you. Obviously, the log will be updated to indicate that that took place. If you set up an application and you have 3 instances running, it will run them for you. If one of them fails, it will spin up another one for you and you’re good to go.

Another capability is, of course, the Unified Log Streaming. One of the features of Pivotal CF is the ability to bring logs together from multiple application instances into the one place. In PWS, we do the same thing. We have this streaming log API that will send all the information, all the components, for your application to the one location. You can tailor this interactively yourself or you can use a syslog drain too, once you have a third party tool you may like. Tools like, Splunk or Logstash etc. They’re all scoped by a unique application ID and an instance index, so they can correlate across multiple events and see how they all fit together, which is nice.

The system also has a really nice Web console, which is built for really agile developers to use. You jump in, you can see what applications are running, where, who started them, what’s going on. You can even connect your spacers with your CI pipeline to make sure that builds are going into the correct life cycle stage of being deployed appropriately as well. You can also see quotas and building across your spacers because you have access to organizations and spacers as well. We’ll talk about organizations and spacers in another episode.

What about from a services perspective? What are some of the services that we have available in the Marketplace? Well, it’s growing all the time. It’s a movable face, as I like to say. We have a number. I’ll just call out a few highlight ones. Things like, Searchify for search, BlazeMeter for load testing, Redis Cloud, which is an enterprise-class cache. We talked about caches a little while ago, ClearDB, which is a MySQL database service. We have Searchly, ElasticSearch. We have the Memcached [D 08:19] Cloud. We have SendGrid for sending e-mail, MongoLab for MongoDB as a service, New Relic obviously for access to performance criteria. RabbitMQ, so through Cloud AMQP, ElephantSQL, PostgreSQL as a service etc, etc. A good selection of services there are available to you to use.

It’s interesting seeing what people use this for. Often, customers who use this for a dev and test experience or to get the developers up to speed with using platform as a service. A company called [Synapse, which I’ll say 08:49], which is small, or young I should say, Boston based company that builds software and service web and mobile apps for consumer startups, they decided to use Pivotal Web Services for their platform because they wanted to just have the same develop experience through dev test and production, and it completely suited their needs. It gave them the flexibility in terms of how they built the application, it gave them the sizing requirements they needed etc. The other nice thing that they got out of it was the ability to deploy their particular application both in the public Cloud or in private Clouds that customers wanted to run. What they realized is that if they had customers who said, ‘Hey we really like your particular application, we like your service, but we want to run it in-house for whatever reason that we have,’ they had a very simple and easy way to say that ‘Hey, you just run Pivotal CF internally, we bring our code across, and it will work fine.’ A really interesting example there.

If you’ve ever wanted to have a play with Pivotal CF, you wondered how it looks, and what the experience is from a developer perspective, then Pivotal Web Services or PWS is the place to go. That’s run.pivotal.io. There’s a 60-day free trial. You don’t have to enter your credit card when you sign up for the free trial. You can have a bit of an experiment and see how you go. Hopefully you’ll be able to make something pretty cool and until then, talk to you later, and keep on building.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the All Things Pivotal podcast. If you enjoyed it, please share it with others. We love hearing your feedback, so please send any comments or suggestions to podcast@pivotal.io.

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Uncategorized

Cloud monitoring category gets busier

1 Feb , 2015  

Server monitoring gets hot SolarWinds, which monitors multi-vendor technologies running in house, last week bought Librato to extend its reach into the cloud. Librato is noted for its ability to watch workloads running in Heroku and Amazon Web Services as well is in internally-run Rails, Node.js, Ruby, […]

Cloud monitoring category gets busier originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

Continue reading…

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Uncategorized

Amazon Web Services gets with the Golang program

30 Gen , 2015  

Amazon Web Services already offers software development kits (SDKs) for Java, C#, Ruby, Python, JavaScript, PHP and Objective C programming languages. Now it says it will add Go (aka Golang) to that list. More accurately, it says it’s taken over aws-go, an SDK developed by Stripe. The SDK […]

Amazon Web Services gets with the Golang program originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

Continue reading…

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PaaS

Top Questions Answered: Watson and Internet of Things

24 Nov , 2014  

Bluemix Webinar Recap

Thank you again to everyone that joined us this year for our 7 webinars on Bluemix. If you missed any of them you can find the replays here:

Webcasts:

Q&A Responses from Watson + IoT Webinar

Thank you all that participated in our webinar on Nov 19th. The number of participants and questions that we received was an inspiring testament to how important this topic is to developers. To recap our webinar, we talked about:

  • What is the Internet of Things?
  • What are industry use cases for Watson and the Internet of Things?
  • Demo of Watson controlling an IoT enabled radio

The talk showed us that Watson can provide context to an Internet of Things device. We showed how a person’s tweets could be analyzed by Watson for sentiment and then used to make a decision about a particular radio station that matches the user’s current mood. We then pushed that to a simulated IoT device for the webinar. The code for the demo will be available in an upcoming developerWorks article.

We are looking forward to continuing our series of Bluemix Webinars in 2015. Please connect with us @IBMBluemix or in the comments to give us ideas and topics that you’d like us to cover.

Question

Answer

Tell me more about the demo

Where can I watch all the replays? Check it out here
Will the code for Watson radio be available for users to download? Can I test it? Yes, we’ll post the code in a soon to be published paper on developerWorks.
wha s the meaning of “Big 5, Needs and values”? I remember these with the acronym OCEAN = openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism.  You can find out more here 
Where is the IoT in this puzzle for the radio demo ? Which device was used to simulate ? We used a simulated radio device for the purposes of screen sharing on a webinar.  The code will tune the radio in an IoT connected radio (our developer did it with his car) 
Great demo, I have the following question related with the demo. Do We need to have a connection with tweeter in order to get the tweet´s that We want to know, or Watson does it for us? The Watson User Modeling API was fed the tweets in the demo and the application did the work using Twitter APIs to get the text.  It will be responsibility of the application coder to identify, gather, and parse the text that is fed to the Watson API.  We have taken feedback on extending the API to take a Twitter handle to do this work automatically.  We appreciate the comments because we’re looking for ways to improve these beta services. 
So we could extrapolate this out to multiple IoT devices/home etc? What about using information from one IoT device, say the music and temp choices in the car to predict TV and Home choices. Great ideas.  The short answer is yes, I believe this to be possible.  Our demo is a real, foundational example to get people started.  We’ll be providing the code in an upcoming developerWorks article for people to use with their own ideas.
does one have to pass the watson service the data to use for analysis or a url to access the data? In our demo, we passed the data that we extracted using the Twitter advanced search API
If Watson has the connecto to tweet, Do We need to pay something for tweet datas? The Twitter APIs are free to use. You can find out more information about the API we used here
In car demo – I guess IoT data should be also used to create prediction model, based on the past user habits. Correct? For our demo, we’re not using past behavior/interaction with the IoT device to predict the radio station that the user would want to hear.  It would be possible to extend the demo to take in other considerations besides just tweets as a data source.  We’ll be providing the code for this demo in an upcoming developerWorks article.  I’m excited to see how people will build upon it.

Tell me more about Bluemix

What IoT services are available on Bluemix? What do I get with them? How much do they cost? The IoT APIs are free to test with up to 20 devices.  After that there are pricing models to fit anyone’s needs.  You can find out more on the pricing page at http://Bluemix.net.  For finding out what we have available check out this documentation and this is also a good set of resources to get started working with IoT
What Watson Services are available on Bluemix? Check out our blog here for a description
What is the first step in order to start watson and BlueMix?, Is there any documentation, examples that I can follow in order to understand them? Step 1:  Sign up for a Bluemix account.  Step 2:  Check out the API documentation and sample code. User Modeling can be found here
what do you mean by “API management”? API management in this case was in reference to how we utilize the inputs and outputs of the User Modeling API.  More depth on how to use this service can be found here

Tell me more about IoT

I’ve heard talk about IPV4 and IPV6 in relation to IoT, can you tell me more about what this means? IPV4 is the old addressing standard that is reaching the limits of unique address space.  The world is adopting a new standard IPV6 to give us enough unique addressing space for IoT devices.  With the new standard, every atom on Earth could have a unique address and we’d still have unique addresses available.
how IoT and bid Data Analysis are connected? In the context of our talk, IoT devices are producing a lot of data which leads to a need for analytics to interpret and leverage this data in a meaningful way.  So, think of the device as only knowing point in time (e.g. the current temp), but the analytics services available on Bluemix can put a point in time observation into context over many point in time readings (e.g. the temp is rising).

Tell me more about Watson

Are you doing work on IoT data with Watson today? In today’s webinar we demonstrate Watson providing context to an IoT device.  We’re not doing work on structured data from an IoT device.  All of the services available on Bluemix take unstructured (aka written language ) data as inputs which is not compatible with rote IoT captured data.
Nathan mentioned in his blog post that there are 10 universities using Watson/Bluemix for pilot projects. Are those universities online posted somewhere? All of the information including schools and how to contact the team is here
How dependent is this on the language of the user ? WIll it only work in English or Spain ? Watson’s services are English based today, but we have Language ID and Machine Translation APIs that can identify and convert text from a native language to English opening the door to using Watson for non-English speakers.  Machine Translation is available in English, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese and French today.
Can you tell us a little bit about Watson applications for healthcare and some of you pilot companies – like Welltok – and how they are using Bluemix services… We have a number of partnerships in the healthcare industry. They have a wide range of applications from working with Doctors fighting cancer at MD Anderson to Welltok’s wellness application for consumers.  The Q&A service is the primary service that partner’s like Welltok are using.  It’s available on Bluemix with a healthcare knowledge base (corpus).  Find out more on the Watson Ecosystem
Facebook and Linked in would likly be more difficult to parse than Twitter. Have you attempted it? Results? We have parsed Twitter data for a number of applications. The User Modeling service demo’d today is agnostic to the source of the text, but ensuring there is good text to interpret is the likely challenge with these sources.
How can you show/prove that the result of user-modeling is actually relevant, with good quality? User Modeling is based on a research technology originally dubbed SystemU.  More information about the research(ers) can be found here
Most human users “behavior” is influenced by “Current conditions” e.g., emergencies, dining, travel etc. I think user’s behavior to current situations is based in an amalgamation of their past experiences.  Our demo was to show that we can glean information about them from past data to provide contextual information about the here and now.
how flexible is data modeling if we are to feed the data to Watson? It takes in text data from a user or group of users.  It’s very flexible and agnostic to the source in my experience.  More information on User Modeling can be found here
Is watson able to scrape an entire site Search Engine style? No, Watson doesn’t do this today though we’ve leverage utilities to gather this information for consumption by Watson.
What kind of corrective feedback provision is made in the user model to ensure that a mistake in interpretation does not result in an intolerable or even dangerously distracting situation in the vehicle example? We didn’t apply any feedback into this demo.  We’re using the sentiment of tweets to pick a radio station.  If the station chosen doesn’t fit the consumer’s expectation it could be annoying, but I don’t think it would put a user in a dangerous situation.
How does a Medical clinician entrepreneur interested in developing a specific clinical tool using Augmented Intelligence approach/interact with appropriate IBM services? The best way to get started is to work with the services that are available on Bluemix.  For deeper assistance, we have the Watson Ecosystem for partners to join. 
So as I understood, we (inventors, or developers) are responsible of feeding Watson with all the historical and live data that we want it to crunch; Watson does not contain any preset set of historical data (by line of business ) that we can leverage? There are 7 Watson services available on Bluemix.  Most of them take in user data that the developer provides like User Modeling, Message Resonance, Machine Translation, etc.  However, the Q&A API is fixed with a healthcare and travel knowledge set (corpus) that can’t be modified while in beta.  Partners using this service in production are tailoring the content in Watson to meet their business needs and are providing all of the historical/contextual information for Watson.
Is it possible to gain temporary access to Watson for testing purposes in order to decide if those services are needed on a permanent basis? It would be nice to test a prototype app before signing a contract to use Watson. Absolutely.  Sign up at http://bluemix.net to get free access to Watson services today.

The Bluemix team is looking forward to hearing from you in and continuing this series of developer inspired webinars. Don’t wait until 2015 to get started, go to Bluemix today and sign up.

The post Top Questions Answered: Watson and Internet of Things appeared first on Bluemix

The post Top Questions Answered: Watson and Internet of Things appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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PaaS

Host Your Own Rubygems Server for Free in 4 Easy Steps

25 Set , 2014  

Ruby

Sometimes you don’t want to share all your gems in a public place like RubyGems.org. If you are in this situation, I have a simple solution that will allow you to host your own gems using OpenShift. Geminabox is a project that provides a private RubyGems host as an open-source application. In this blog post, I will show how to install and use Geminabox on OpenShift.

And it’s super-easy!

Deploy the Ruby host

The whole deployment can be done in one simple step

rhc app create rubygems ruby-2.0 --from-code=https://github.com/openshift-quickstart/rubygems-quickstart.git

With this single command we ask OpenShift to create a new gear pre-configured for Ruby 2.0 and fetch the application from a Github repository, and put it into the newly created gear. OpenShift also starts the application for you, so the only thing you need to do is to navigate your browser to:

https://rubygems-.rhcloud.com/

The domain is user dependent and you’ll need to change it for the one you chose for your account.

If you don’t need a secured instance, you are done with the server part.

Securing the Rubygems Installation

As you are deploying a private RubyGems host, you probably want some privacy for your code. And yes, that’s also possible. To do that you need to change the code a bit.

Start by cloning the application code to your local machine and then enter the directory:

rhc git-clone rubygems
cd rubygems

now edit the config.ru file … uncomment these three commented lines:

use Rack::Auth::Basic, "RubyGems" do |username, password|
  username == 'rubygems' && password == 'password'
end

Finally change the username and password to something more secure and save the file.

The last thing you need to do is commit the code to your git repository and push it to OpenShift

git add .
git commit -m "Make it more secure"
git push origin master

and bam … your RubyGems host now requires valid credentials.

How to use

Once you have your own RubyGems host deployed, you can start using it. How you use it depends mostly on the tools you prefer. You probably use Bundler to manage the gems for your project. If you do, the only change you need to do is to replace the “source” in the Gemfile.

source 'https://rubygems-.rhcloud.com/'
 
gem 'x'
gem 'y'
...

Again, substitute the domain name to reflect for your own. You can completely remove the mention of RubyGems.org since your new RubyGems host acts as a mirror for it.

If you secured your installation you’ll need to specify the username and password:

source 'https://rubygems:password@rubygems-.rhcloud.com/'

Now your project should use your newly deployed RubyGems host as the gem repository.

Deploying your own gems

To deploy your gems to your new RubyGems host, simply upload the gem file using the web interface. This works without installing any tools locally.

If you want to deploy the gems from the command line, you need to install the “geminabox” gem

gem install geminabox

Then use it to push the gem file to the server:

gem inabox  -g "https://rubygems-.rhcloud.com/"

Replace the domain with your own (and use username and password to authenticate, if you have enabled it).

Conclusion

Now you can host your own gems in your own private repository on OpenShift. OpenShift allows you to deploy this application for free so why not try it out?

Next Steps

The post Host Your Own Rubygems Server for Free in 4 Easy Steps appeared first on Platform as a Service Magazine.

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Uncategorized

Jelastic Ruby in the Sky with Diamonds at RubyConf Brazil 2014

11 Set , 2014  

A couple of weeks ago, our team headed to Brazil for RubyConf and the event was a great success! RubyConf Brazil 2014 is a unique event geared towards software developers that wish to learn and upgrade their knowledge in topics such as Ruby, Ruby on Rails, Agile Practices, Javascript, NoSQL, Security,…

The post Jelastic Ruby in the Sky with Diamonds at RubyConf Brazil 2014 appeared first on Jelastic Blog.

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